ore

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See also: oré, orë, öre, and øre

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Middle English or, oor, blend of Old English ōra (ore, unwrought metal) and ār (brass, copper, bronze), the first a derivate of ear (earth), the second from Proto-Germanic *aiz (compare Old Norse eir (brass, copper), German ehern (brazen, bronzen), Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌶 (aiz, ore)), from Proto-Indo-European *áyos, h₂éyos. Confer Latin aes (bronze, copper), Avestan ayah, Sanskrit अयस् (áyas, copper, iron).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ore (countable and uncountable, plural ores)

  1. Rock that contains utilitarian materials; primarily a rock containing metals or gems which—at the time of the rock's evaluation and proposal for extraction—are able to be separated from its neighboring minerals and processed at a cost that does not exceed those materials' present-day economic values.
    • 2014 April 21, “Subtle effects”, The Economist, volume 411, number 8884: 
      Manganism has been known about since the 19th century, when miners exposed to ores containing manganese, a silvery metal, began to totter, slur their speech and behave like someone inebriated.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

ore

  1. plural form of oor

Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

ore

  1. dough

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

ore

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of orar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of orar

Guaraní[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ore

  1. us
  2. our

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

ore

  1. plural form of ora (hours)

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ore

  1. rōmaji reading of おれ

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

ōre (n)

  1. ablative singular of ōs

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch ōra, from Proto-Germanic *ausô.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ôre n

  1. ear

Descendants[edit]


Middle High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German ōra, from Proto-Germanic *ausô.

Noun[edit]

ore n

  1. ear

Descendants[edit]


Middle Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Saxon ōra, from Proto-Germanic *ausô.

Noun[edit]

ore n

  1. ear

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ore

  1. now
Descendants[edit]
  • French: or (archaic)

Etymology 2[edit]

Ancient Greek ὥρα (hṓra), Latin hōra

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ore f (oblique plural ores, nominative singular ore, nominative plural ores)

  1. time, period of the day (period of time)
    circa 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
    quel haste avez,
    Qui a tel ore vos levez?
    What haste do you have
    That wakes up at this time of day?
Descendants[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

ore

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of orar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of orar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of orar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of orar

Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

ore f pl

  1. plural form of oră

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

ore

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of orar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of orar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of orar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of orar.

Tarantino[edit]

Noun[edit]

ore

  1. gold