ar

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Contents

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar (plural ars)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter R/r.
    All the ars in the inscription.

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aurum.

Noun[edit]

ar m (definite singular ari)

  1. gold

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin arō. Compare Daco-Romanian ara, ar.

Verb[edit]

ar (past participle aratã)

  1. I plough.

Related terms[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar

  1. male

Breton[edit]

Article[edit]

ar

  1. the

See also[edit]


Cimbrian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ar

  1. shortening of èar

References[edit]

  • “ar” in Umberto Martello Martalar, Alfonso Bellotto, Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Setti Communi vicentini, 1st edition, 1974.

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse ørr.

Noun[edit]

ar n (singular definite arret, plural indefinite ar)

  1. scar
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French are, from Latin ārea (open space).

Noun[edit]

ar c (singular definite aren, plural indefinite ar)

  1. are (square decametre, 100 m²)
Inflection[edit]

External links[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m, f (plural arren, diminutive arretje n)

  1. (obsolete) sledge

Esperanto[edit]

See also -ar-

Noun[edit]

ar (plural ar-oj, accusative singular ar-on, accusative plural ar-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter R/r.

See also[edit]


Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (plural ares)

  1. air

Synonyms[edit]


Hausa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ar̃

Interjection[edit]

ar

  1. damn it

Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish for, from Proto-Celtic *uɸor (compare Welsh ar), from Proto-Indo-European *upér (compare Latin super, Ancient Greek ὑπέρ (huper), Old English ofer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ar (triggers lenition)

  1. on
  2. Used with a variety of nouns to indicate feelings and minor medical conditions
    Tá áthas orm.
    I am glad. (lit. ‘Joy is on me’)
    Tá ocras orm.
    I am hungry. (lit. ‘Hunger is on me’)
    Tá slaghdán orm.
    I have a cold. (lit. ‘A cold is on me’)
Inflection[edit]
Person Normal Emphatic
1st person sing. orm ormsa
2d person sing. ort ortsa
3d sing. masc. air airsean
3d sing. fem. uirthi uirthise
1st person pl. orainn orainne
2d person pl. oraibh oraibhse
3d person pl. orthu orthusan

Etymology 2[edit]

an +‎ -r

Particle[edit]

ar (triggers lenition except of past autonomous forms; used only in the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

  1. Used to form direct and indirect questions
    Ar chuala tú mé? — Did you hear me?
    Níl a fhios agam ar chas sé an t-amhrán. — I don’t know if/whether he sang the song.
    Ar ól an cat an bainne? — Did the cat drink the milk?
    Ar cuireadh an síol? — Was the seed sown?
  2. Used to form direct and indirect copular questions; used before consonants
    Ar mhúinteoir tú? — Were you a teacher?
Related terms[edit]
  • an (used in non-past tenses and in the past tense of some irregular verbs)
  • arbh (copular form used before vowels)

Etymology 3[edit]

a +‎ -r

Particle[edit]

ar (triggers lenition except of past autonomous forms; used only in the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

  1. Introduces an indirect relative clause
    an chathaoir ar shuigh an gasúr air — the chair the boy sat on
    an cailín ar ól a cat an bainne — the girl whose cat drank the milk
    an gort ar cuireadh an síol ann — the field the seed was sown in
Related terms[edit]
  • a (form used with non-past tenses and with the past of some irregular verbs)

Particle[edit]

ar (copular form used before consonants; triggers lenition in the past/conditional)

  1. Introduces an indirect relative clause; present/future tense
    an fear ar múinteoir a mhac — the man whose son is a teacher
  2. Introduces an indirect relative clause; past/conditional tense
    an fear ar mhúinteoir a mhac — the man whose son was a teacher
  3. Introduces a direct or indirect interrogative; past/conditional tense
    Ar mhaith leat cupán tae?
    Would you like a cup of tea?
    Níl a fhios agam ar mhaith léi cupán tae.
    I don’t know if she would like a cup of tea.
Related terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ar (triggers lenition except of past autonomous forms; used only in the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

  1. all that, whatever
    Sin ar chonnaic mé ann. — That’s all that I saw there.
    Ar thuig tú ar canadh? — Did you understand all that was sung?
    Cheannaigh mé ar íoc tú as. — I bought whatever you paid for.
Related terms[edit]
  • a (form used with non-past tenses and with the past of some irregular verbs)

Etymology 4[edit]

Verb[edit]

ar (used only with 3rd-person pronouns, usually emphatic)

  1. said, says
    “Tar isteach,” ar seisean.
    “Come in,” he said.
    “Ní thuigim,” ar sise.
    “I don’t understand,” she says.
    “Cén fáth?” ar siadsan.
    “Why?” they said.
Related terms[edit]
  • arsa (used with other persons and with full nouns)

Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar ?

  1. flour
  2. fire
  3. shame, disgrace
  4. are (square decametre, 100 m²)
  5. Abbreviation of argon.

Synonyms[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ar (with instrumental)

  1. with

Verb[edit]

ar

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of art
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of art
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of art
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of art
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of art
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of art

Lithuanian[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ar

  1. whether (if (in indirect questions))


This Lithuanian entry was created from the translations listed at whether. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see ar in the Lithuanian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) February 2010


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aizō (respect, honour), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eys- (to honour, respect, revere). Cognate with Old Saxon ēra (Dutch eer), Old High German ēra (German Ehre), Old Norse eir

Noun[edit]

ār f

  1. honor, glory, grace
    He sundor lif wæs foreberende eallum ðam arum.
    He preferred a private life to all honours.
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Old Norse ár [1](Danish åre, Swedish åra).

Noun[edit]

ār f

  1. oar
Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *airuz. Cognate with Old Saxon ēru, Old Norse árr, Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌿𐍃 (airus).

Noun[edit]

ār m

  1. messenger, herald
    • 8th-11th century, Beowulf, ll. 335-6:
      Ic eom Hroðgares ar ond ombiht.
      I am Hrothgar's herald and officer.
  2. angel
  3. missionary
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ oar” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *ɸare (in front of), from Proto-Indo-European *prH-. Cognates include Greek παρά (pará, beside) and English fore.

Preposition[edit]

ar

  1. for, for the sake of, because of
    • circa 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, Wb. 12c29
      ar formut frib-si as·biur-sa inso.
      It is not because of envy towards you that I say this.

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (abbreviation a)

  1. are (square decametre, 100 m²)

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar

  1. genitive plural of ara

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese aar, aire, aere, from Latin āēr, from Ancient Greek ἀήρ (aēr, air), from Proto-Indo-European *awe- (to blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (plural ares)

  1. air
  2. look, air (aspect)

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

(el/ea) ar (modal auxiliary; third-person singular form of avea, used with infinitives to form conditional tenses)

  1. (he/she) would

Verb[edit]

(ele/ei) ar (modal auxiliary; third-person plural form of avea, used with infinitives to form conditional tenses)

  1. (they) would

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

ar

  1. first-person singular present tense form of ara.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of ara.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ar

  1. our
    Tha ar nighean ruadh.
    Our daughter is red-haired.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Before a vowel, it takes the form ar n-:
    ar n-eaglais - our church

Verb[edit]

ar (defective)

  1. think

Usage notes[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (Cyrillic spelling ар)

  1. are (square decametre, 100 m²)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar c, n

  1. are (square decametre, 100 m²)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French are.

Noun[edit]

ar (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Turkish|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Turkish|{{{2}}}]])

  1. feeling of shame
  2. are (unit of area)

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ar

  1. on

See also[edit]

Personal forms
Singular Plural
First person arna i arnon ni
Second person arnat ti arnoch chi
Third person arno fe
arni hi
arnyn nhw