gee

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A shortening of Jesus, perhaps as in the oath by Jesus

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

gee

  1. A general exclamation of surprise or frustration.
    Gee, I didn't know that!
    Gee, this is swell fun!
Usage notes[edit]

Gee is generally considered somewhat dated or juvenile. It is often used for ironic effect, with the speaker putting on the persona of a freshly-scrubbed freckle-faced kid from days gone by (e.g. 1950 sitcom children, such as Beaver on Leave it to Beaver).

Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gee (third-person singular simple present gees, present participle geeing, simple past and past participle geed)

  1. (often as imperative to a draft animal) To turn in a direction away from the driver, typically to the right.
    This horse won't gee when I tell him to.
    You may need to walk up to the front of the pack and physically gee the lead dog.
    Mush, huskies. Now, gee! Gee!
  2. (UK, dialect, obsolete) To agree; to harmonize.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Forby to this entry?)
Coordinate terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

gee (plural gees)

  1. A gee-gee; a horse.

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation of the letter G.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gee (plural gees)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter G/g.
    One branch of English society drops its initial aitches, and another branch ignores its terminal gees.
  2. (slang) Abbreviation of grand; a thousand dollars.
    ten gees
  3. (physics) Abbreviation of gravity; the unit of acceleration equal to that exerted by gravity at the earth's surface.
  4. (US, slang) A guy.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 197:
      Just off the highway there's a small garage and paint-shop run by a gee named Art Huck.
Related terms[edit]
  • gay (in shorthand)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gee (plural gees)

  1. (Ireland, slang) vagina, vulva[1]
    • 1987, Roddy Doyle, The Commitments, King Farouk, Dublin:
      The brassers, yeh know wha' I mean. The gee. Is tha' why?
    • 1991, Roddy Doyle, The Van, p. 65. Secker & Warburg (ISBN: 0-436-20052-X):
      But he'd had to keep feeling them up and down from her knees up to her gee after she'd said that....
    • 1992, Samuel Beckett, Dream of Fair to Middling Women, p. 71. John Calder (ISBN: 978-0714542133):
      Lily Neary has a lovely gee and her pore Paddy got his B.A. and by the holy fly I wouldn't recommend you to ask me what class of a tree they were under when he put his hand on her and enjoyed that.
    • 1995, Joseph O'Connor, Red Roses and Petrol, p. 7. Methuen (ISBN: 978-0413699909):
      And I thought, gee is certainly something that gobshite knows all about.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English p. 850, Tom Dalzell and Terry Victor. Routledge, 2006. ISBN: 0-415-25937-1.

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch geven.

Verb[edit]

gee (present gee, present participle gewende, past participle gegee)

  1. to give

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gee

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter G/g.
  2. (physics) the unit of acceleration equal to that exerted by gravity

Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]