gut

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See also: Gut, GUT, and guts

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gut, gutte, gotte, from Old English gutt (usually in plural guttas (guts, entrails)), from Proto-Germanic *gut-, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeud- (to pour). Related to English gote (drain), Old English ġēotan (to pour). More at gote, yote.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gut (plural guts)

  1. The alimentary canal, especially the intestine.
  2. (informal) The abdomen of a person, especially one that is enlarged
    beer gut
  3. (uncountable) The intestines of an animal used to make strings of a tennis racket or violin, etc.
  4. A person's emotional, visceral self.
    I have a funny feeling in my gut.
  5. (in the plural) The essential, core parts.
    He knew all about the guts of the business, how things actually get done.
  6. (in the plural) Ability and will to face up to adversity or unpleasantness.
    It took a lot of guts to admit to using banned substances on television.
  7. (informal) A gut course
    You should take Intro Astronomy: it's a gut.
  8. A narrow passage of water.
    the Gut of Canso
  9. The sac of silk taken from a silkworm when ready to spin its cocoon, for the purpose of drawing it out into a thread. When dry, it is exceedingly strong, and is used as the snood of a fishing line.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

gut (third-person singular simple present guts, present participle gutting, simple past and past participle gutted)

  1. (transitive) To eviscerate.
  2. (transitive) To remove or destroy the most important parts of.
    • fire gutted the building
    • Congress gutted the welfare bill.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gut (comparative more gut, superlative most gut)

  1. Made of gut, e.g., a violin with gut strings
  2. Instinctive, e.g., a gut reaction

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡut/, [ɡ̊ud̥]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Norwegian gutt.

Noun[edit]

gut c (singular definite gutten, plural indefinite gutter)

  1. boy, lad, bloke
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English gut.

Noun[edit]

gut c (singular definite gutten, not used in plural form)

  1. gut (intestines of an animal used to make strings of a tennis racket or violin, etc)

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German guot, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰedʰ-. Cognate to Dutch and West Frisian goed, English good, Danish god.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡuːt/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /gʊt/ (colloquial, generally only for the interjection)
  • (file)
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

gut (comparative besser, superlative am besten)

  1. good

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

gut

  1. well
    Die Mannschaft hat gut gespielt.
    The team played well.

Interjection[edit]

gut

  1. okay, all right, now then
    Gut, dann fangen wir mal an.
    All right, then let's get started.

External links[edit]

  • gut in Duden online

External links[edit]

  • gut in Duden online

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

gut

  1. rafsi of gunta.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

gut m (definite singular guten, indefinite plural gutar, definite plural gutane)

  1. boy (young male)

Romansch[edit]

Noun[edit]

gut m (plural guts)

  1. drop

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English good.

Adverb[edit]

gut

  1. well

Related terms[edit]