canal

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English[edit]

A canal.
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Etymology[edit]

From French canal, from Old French canal, from Latin canālis (channel; canal), from Latin canālis (canal), from canna (reed, cane), from Ancient Greek κάννα (kánna, reed), from Akkadian 𒄀 (qanû, reed), from Sumerian 𒄀𒈾 (gi.na).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canal (plural canals)

  1. An artificial waterway, often connecting one body of water with another
  2. A tubular channel within the body.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

canal (third-person singular simple present canals, present participle canaling or canalling, simple past and past participle canaled or canalled)

  1. To dig an artificial waterway in or to (a place), especially for drainage
    • 1968, Louisiana State University, Proceedings[1], page 165:
      In the mangrove-type salt marsh, the entire marsh must be canaled or impounded.
  2. To travel along a canal by boat
    • 1905, William Yoast Morgan, A Journey of a Jayhawker, page 211:
      Near Rotterdam we canalled by Delfthaven.

Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

canal m (plural canales)

  1. canal (artificial waterway)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin canālis (channel; canal).

Noun[edit]

canal m (plural canals)

  1. canal; channel (artificial passage for water)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French canal, from Latin canālis (channel; canal).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canal m (plural canaux)

  1. canal
  2. channel (broadcasting: specific radio frequency or band of frequencies)

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French canal, from Latin canālis (channel; canal).

Noun[edit]

canal m (plural canaux)

  1. canal

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

canal

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese canal, from Latin canālis (canal), from canna (reed, cane), from Ancient Greek κάννα (kánna, reed), from Akkadian 𒄀 (qanû, reed), from Sumerian 𒄀𒈾 (gi.na).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canal m (plural canais)

  1. ditch
  2. canal (artificial waterway)
  3. (radio) channel (broadcasting: specific radio frequency or band of frequencies)
  4. (television) television channel

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French canal, from Latin canalis.

Noun[edit]

canal n (plural canale)

  1. channel
  2. (plural canaluri) canal

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin canālis (channel; canal).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canal m (plural canales)

  1. canal (waterway)
  2. channel (of television)
  3. (communication) channel
  4. (chemistry) channel
  5. cleavage

Derived terms[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

canal m (plural canałi)

  1. canal
  2. channel (all senses)