lad

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See also: ląd, ład, and ľad

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English ladde (foot soldier, servant). Possibly cognate with Dutch lid (member).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lad (plural lads)

  1. (chiefly UK) A boy or young man.
  2. (UK) A jack the lad; a boyo.
    I think he reckons he's a bit of a lad.
  3. A familiar term of address for a young man.
  4. A groom who works with horses (also called stable-lad).
  5. (Ireland) The penis.
    • 1995 May 5, “The Passion of St Tibulus”, Father Ted episode, written by Graham Linehan and Arthur Matthews:
      Mrs Glynn: Oh but there's this great bit in it. You see, there was this girl, but then you find out it's not a girl but a man!
      Mrs Sheridan: And he got his lad out.
    • 2007, Unknown, translated by Ciaran Carson, The Táin, ISBN 9780140455304, page 175:
      And he loaded the chariot with clods and boulders and cobbles that he fired at anyone who came to stare at him and jeer him, stark naked as he was, with his long lad and his acorns dangling down through the floor of the chariot.
    • 2010, Loucinda McGary, The Wild Irish Sea: A Windswept Tale of Love and Magic, ISBN 1402226713, page 11:
      Just thinking about how she would look without her clothes made his lad twitch with anticipation.

Usage notes[edit]

Prevalent in Northern English dialects such as Geordie, Mackem, Scouse and Northumbrian.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4[1]
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [3]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lad (neuter ladt, definite and plural lade)

  1. languid, lazy, indolent

Noun[edit]

lad n (singular definite ladet, plural indefinite lad)

  1. bed (platform of a truck, trailer, railcar, or other vehicle that supports the load to be hauled), eg. truckbed

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

lad

  1. Imperative of lade.

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

lad

  1. Imperative singular of laden.

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

lad

  1. rafsi of ladru.

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Proto-Germanic *laidō. Cognate with Old High German leita (German Leite), Old Norse leið.

Noun[edit]

lād f

  1. way, course
  2. passage, watercourse, lode
  3. carrying, bringing
  4. provision, sustenance
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Old English. Akin to Old Frisian lēde, lāde.

Noun[edit]

lād f

  1. exculpation, clearing of guilt or accusation, purgation
  2. defense against a charge, excuse
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sutsilvan) lo

Adjective[edit]

lad m (feminine lada, masculine plural lads, feminine plural ladas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) wide, broad

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) lartg
  • (Puter, Vallader) larg

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lad (plural lads)

  1. lad
  2. son
  3. menial
  4. male sweetheart

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

lad (plural lads)

  1. heart

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]