wide

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English wid, wyd, from Old English wīd (wide, vast, broad, long; distant, far), from Proto-Germanic *wīdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wī- (apart, asunder, in two), from Proto-Indo-European *weye- (to drive, separate). Cognate with Scots wyd, wid (of great extent; vast), West Frisian wiid (broad; wide), Dutch wijd (wide; large; broad), German weit (far; wide; broad), Swedish vid (wide), Icelandic víður (wide), Latin dīvidō (separate, sunder), Latin vītō (avoid, shun). Related to widow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wide (comparative wider, superlative widest)

  1. Having a large physical extent from side to side.
    We walked down a wide corridor.
  2. Large in scope.
    • 2013 July-August, Fenella Saunders, “Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture”, American Scientist: 
      The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles, increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail.
    The inquiry had a wide remit.
  3. (sports) Operating at the side of the playing area.
    That team needs a decent wide player.
  4. On one side or the other of the mark; too far sideways from the mark, the wicket, the batsman, etc.
    Too bad! That was a great passing-shot, but it's wide.
    • Spenser
      Surely he shoots wide on the bow hand.
    • Massinger
      I was but two bows wide.
  5. (phonetics, dated) Made, as a vowel, with a less tense, and more open and relaxed, condition of the organs in the mouth.
  6. Remote; distant; far.
    • Hammond
      the contrary being so wide from the truth of Scripture and the attributes of God
  7. (obsolete) Far from truth, propriety, necessity, etc.
    • Milton
      our wide expositors
    • Latimer
      It is far wide that the people have such judgments.
    • Herbert
      How wide is all this long pretence!

Antonyms[edit]

  • narrow (regarding empty area)
  • thin (regarding occupied area)
  • skinny (sometimes offensive, regarding body width)

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wide (comparative wider, superlative widest)

  1. extensively
    He travelled far and wide.
  2. completely
    He was wide awake.
  3. away from a given goal
    The arrow fell wide of the mark.
    • 2010 December 29, Sam Sheringham, “Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton”, BBC:
      The Reds carved the first opening of the second period as Glen Johnson's pull-back found David Ngog but the Frenchman hooked wide from six yards.
  4. So as to leave or have a great space between the sides; so as to form a large opening.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

wide (plural wides)

  1. (cricket) A ball that passes so far from the batsman that the umpire deems it unplayable; the arm signal used by an umpire to signal a wide; the extra run added to the batting side's score

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From wīd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wīde

  1. widely