pan

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English panne, from Proto-Germanic *pannōn. Cognate with Dutch pan, German Pfanne.

Noun[edit]

pan (plural pans)

A pan (1)
  1. A wide, flat receptacle used around the house, especially for cooking
  2. The contents of such a receptacle
  3. A cylindrical receptacle about as tall as it is wide, with one long handle, usually made of metal, used for cooking in the home
  4. (Ireland) A deep plastic receptacle, used for washing or food preparation. A basin.
  5. A wide receptacle in which gold grains are separated from gravel by washing the contents with water
  6. (geography) a specific type of lake, natural depression or basin. They are sometimes associated with desert areas
  7. Strong adverse criticism
  8. A loaf of bread
  9. The base part of a toilet, consisting of a bowl and a footing
  10. (slang) A human face, a mug.
    • 1953, Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye, Penguin 2010, p. 103:
      This was the kind of operator who would tell you to be there at nine sharp and if you weren't sitting quietly with a pleased smile on your pan when he floated in two hours later on a double Gibson, he would have a paroxysm of outraged executive ability […].
  11. (roofing) The bottom flat part of a roofing panel that is between the ribs of the panel
  12. A closed vessel for boiling or evaporating as part of manufacture; a vacuum pan.
  13. The part of a flintlock that holds the priming.
  14. The skull, considered as a vessel containing the brain; the brain-pan.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  15. (carpentry) A recess, or bed, for the leaf of a hinge.
  16. The hard stratum of earth that lies below the soil; hardpan.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

panned gold

pan (third-person singular simple present pans, present participle panning, simple past and past participle panned)

  1. (transitive) To wash in a pan (of earth, sand etc. when searching for gold).
    • General Sherman
      We [] witnessed the process of cleaning up and panning out, which is the last process of separating the pure gold from the fine dirt and black sand.
  2. (transitive) To disparage; to belittle; to put down; to criticise severely.
    • 2013, Catwoman (film), English Wikipedia:
      Catwoman was heavily panned by critics and holds a 9% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 179 reviews with the consensus stating: "Halle Berry is the lone bright spot, but even she can't save this laughable action thriller".
  3. (intransitive) With "out" (to pan out), to turn out well; to be successful.
  4. (transitive, informal, of a contest) To beat one's opposition convincingly.
Coordinate terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From a clipped form of panorama.

Verb[edit]

pan (third-person singular simple present pans, present participle panning, simple past and past participle panned)

  1. to turn horizontally (of a camera etc.)
  2. (intransitive, photography) to move the camera lens angle while continuing to expose the film, enabling a contiguous view and enrichment of context. In still-photography large-group portraits the film usually remains on a horizontal fixed plane as the lens and/or the film holder moves to expose the film laterally. The resulting image may extend a short distance laterally or as great as 360 degrees from the point where the film first began to be exposed.
  3. (audio) To spread a sound signal into a new stereo or multichannel sound field, typically giving the impression that it is moving across the sound stage.
Coordinate terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of paan.

Etymology 4[edit]

Compare French pan (skirt, lappet), Latin pannus (a cloth, rag).

Verb[edit]

pan (third-person singular simple present pans, present participle panning, simple past and past participle panned)

  1. To join or fit together; to unite.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Etymology 5[edit]

Old English. See pane.

Noun[edit]

pan (plural pans)

  1. A part; a portion.
  2. (fortifications) The distance comprised between the angle of the epaule and the flanked angle.
  3. A leaf of gold or silver.

Etymology 6[edit]

From pansexual by shortening.

Adjective[edit]

pan (not comparable)

  1. (slang) Pansexual.
    • 2012, Anna Waugh, "Texas got a pansexual legislator", Dallas Voice, Volume 29, Issue 33, 28 December 2012, page 9:
      When she publicly acknowledged that she is pan, it educated citizens near and far on what that sexuality meant and the importance of being proud of who you are.
    • 2013, Alejandra Rodriguez, "Isn't That Bisexual?", Outwrite, Fall 2013, page 7:
      Another anonymous pansexual disclosed, "Sometimes I feel really left out because I'm pan. []
    • 2013, Megan Hertner, "Understanding Gender and Sexuality", Grapevine (Huron University College), December 2013, page 19:
      A similar experience is shared by individuals who identify their sexuality as pan, bi or queer.
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see the citations page.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan (plural panne)

  1. lake
  2. pan

Synonyms[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānis.

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural panes)

  1. bread

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan f (plural pannen, diminutive pannetje n)

  1. pan
  2. (Netherlands) pot

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pannus.

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural pans)

  1. piece, part
  2. side, face
  3. lap (of coat)
  4. patch, area, section, sector

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection[edit]

pan

  1. (the sound of a gun) bang!
    Pan! T'es mort!
    Bang! You're dead!
  2. bam!

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānis.

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural pans)

  1. bread

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānis.

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural pans)

  1. bread
  2. (by extension) any food

Related terms[edit]


Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānis.

Noun[edit]

pan m

  1. bread

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

pan

  1. rōmaji reading of パン

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

pan

  1. rafsi of panci.

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan m (invariable)

  1. bread

Malay[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan

  1. grandmother

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

pan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of pān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of pán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of pǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of pàn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal pan < Latin pānis.

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural pans)

  1. bread

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānem, accusative singular form of pānis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural pães)

  1. bread

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

XIV c. Unknown etymology. West Slavic word. Cognate to Old Czech hpan, Czech, Slovak, Sorbian pan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan m

  1. gentleman, man
  2. master, teacher
  3. lord
  4. Mr, mister

Declension[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

pan

  1. you (polite second person m-personal nominative, it takes verbs as third-person sg form)
    Czy mógłby pan zamknąć drzwi? – Could you close the door?

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter) paun
  • (Sutsilvan) pàn
  • (Surmiran) pang

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānis.

Noun[edit]

pan m

  1. (Vallader) bread

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural pans)

  1. (Vallader) loaf of bread

Spanish[edit]

Pan

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānis (compare Catalan pa, French pain, Galician pan, Italian pane, Portuguese pão, Romanian pâine), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to feed, to graze).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural panes)

  1. bread
    Para mi desayuno, tomo pan y leche.
    For my breakfast, I have bread and milk.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin panis. Compare Italian pane and Neapolitan pane.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pan m (plural pani)

  1. bread