officer

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English[edit]

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A military officer

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman officer, officier, from Late Latin officiarius (official), from Latin officium (office) + -ārius (-er).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

officer (plural officers)

  1. ​One who has a position of authority in a hierarchical organization, especially in military, police or government organizations.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 19, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises, accompanied by a sort of village bailiff, going his round like a commanding officer doing billets.
  2. ​One who holds a public office.
  3. ​An agent or servant imparted with the ability, to some degree, to act on initiative.
  4. (colloquial, military) A commissioned officer.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

officer (third-person singular simple present officers, present participle officering, simple past and past participle officered)

  1. (transitive) To supply with officers.
  2. (transitive) To command like an officer.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

officer m (oblique plural officers, nominative singular officers, nominative plural officer)

  1. officer

References[edit]