estate

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English[edit]

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 Estate on Wikipedia

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman astat, from Old French estat (French: état).

Noun[edit]

estate (plural estates)

  1. (now rare, archaic) State; condition. [from 13thc.]
  2. (archaic) Status, rank. [from 13thc.]
    • Jeremy Taylor (1613–1677)
      God hath imprinted his authority in several parts, upon several estates of men.
  3. (archaic) The condition of one's fortunes; prosperity, possessions. [from 14thc.]
  4. (obsolete) A "person of estate"; a nobleman or noblewoman. [14th-17thc.]
    • 1485, Syr Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Bk.XVI, Ch.xj:
      And anone came oute of a chamber to hym the fayrest lady that euer he sawe & more rycher bysene than euer he sawe Quene Gueneuer or ony other estat Lo sayd they syre Bors here is the lady vnto whome we owe alle oure seruyse / and I trowe she be the rychest lady and the fayrest of alle the world
    • Bible, Mark vi. 21
      Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief estates of Galilee.
    • Walter Landor (1775-1864)
      She's a duchess, a great estate.
  5. (historical) A major social class or order of persons regarded collectively as part of the body politic of the country and formerly possessing distinct political rights (Estates of the realm). [from 14thc.]
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, p.115:
      I am afraid that some of the nobles who are campaigning for it simply want to use the Estates to cut down the King's power and increase their own.
    • 2011, Norman Davies, Vanished Kingdoms, Penguin 2012, p.202:
      The three estates of feudal lords, clergy and royal officers met in separate chambers, and exercised an advisory role.
  6. (law) The nature and extent of a person's interest in, or ownership of, land. [from 15thc.]
  7. An (especially extensive) area of land, under a single ownership. [from 18thc.]
  8. The collective property and liabilities of someone, especially a deceased person. [from 19thc.]
  9. (UK) A housing estate. [from 20thc.]
  10. (UK, automotive) A station wagon; a car with a tailgate (or liftgate) and storage space to the rear of the seating which is coterminous with the passenger compartment (and often extensible into that compartment via folding or removable seating). [from 20thc.]
  11. (obsolete) The state; the general body politic; the common-wealth; the general interest; state affairs.
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
      I call matters of estate not only the parts of sovereignty, but whatsoever [] concerneth manifestly any great portion of people.

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Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian.

Noun[edit]

estate (plural estates)

  1. summer

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aestātem, accusative of aestās.

Noun[edit]

estate f (plural estati)

  1. summer

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Novial[edit]

Noun[edit]

estate (plural estates)

  1. estate

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

estate

  1. Compound of the informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of estar, está and the pronoun te.