ja

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ja (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly South Africa, informal) yes

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. yes

Amuzgo[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ja

  1. heavy

Pronoun[edit]

ja

  1. I

Assan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔaʒ ("I"). Compare Kott ai ("I") and Pumpokol ad ("I"). Also see Arin aj.

Pronoun[edit]

ja

  1. I (first-person singular subjective)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin iam.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -a

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. already, (in negative sentences) any more
  2. now, immediately, at once

Derived terms[edit]


Central Melanau[edit]

Central Melanau cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : ja

Alternative forms[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ja

  1. (cardinal) one

Synonyms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse (yes).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ja

  1. yes

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ja n (singular definite jaet, plural indefinite jaer)

  1. yes

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ja, from Old Dutch *jā, from Proto-Germanic *ja.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. yes
    Wil je met ons meegaan?Ja, graag!
    Would you like to come with us? — Yes, I'd love to!

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ja m, n (plural ja's, diminutive jaatje n)

  1. yes
    Een ja kan je krijgen, een nee heb je al.
    A yes you can get, a no you already have.
    Het begon met een ja...
    It began with a yes...

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ja

  1. yes!
    "Ja!" riep hij luid toen er een doelpunt viel.
    Yes! he screamed loudly when they scored a goal.

Synonyms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German ja.

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. indeed

Estonian[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ja

  1. and

Synonyms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *ja.

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. yes

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jahw (and); compare Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌷 (jah), Old High German ja, joh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ja

  1. (coordinating) and

Synonyms[edit]

  • sekä (used when listing things — not when joining clauses)

References[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German, from Old High German ja, jā (yes), from Proto-Germanic *ja (yes), from Proto-Indo-European *yē (already). Cognate with Dutch ja (yes), English yea (yes, yea), Latin iam (already). More at yes.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /jaː/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aː
  • Homophone: Jahr (according to a widespread pronunciation of this word)

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. yes
    Willst du das? Ja. — “Do you want that? Yes.”
    Aber ja! — “Yes, of course!”
  2. (intensifier) obviously; certainly; of course; really; just; as you know; as is generally known (indicates and emphasises that one is expressing a known fact)
    Es kann ja nicht immer so bleiben. — “It obviously cannot always remain so.”
    Der Peter war ja gestern krank. – “Peter was sick yesterday, as you know.”

Usage notes[edit]

  • (yes): Ja is used to indicate agreement with a positive statement. To contradict a negative statement (where English would use “yes”), doch is used instead.
  • (obviously): Ja means roughly the same as English obviously or as you know, but given its shortness it is used much more frequently. In colloquial German, ja is used in almost every statement of a fact already known to the one addressed.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ja

  1. yes

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ja

  1. Romanization of 𐌾𐌰

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈjɒ/, /ˈjɒː/ (the long pronunciation is used in case of great surprise)
  • (file)

Interjection[edit]

ja

  1. (informal) yep (indicates agreement, approval, or understanding)
    Jössz holnap a meccsre? - Ja. - Are you coming to the game tomorrow? - Yep.
  2. oh (indicates understanding something finally after a misunderstanding or confusion)
    Este nem jár a vonat. - Ja, hát akkor menjünk busszal! - No train is leaving in the evening. - Oh, well then let's travel by bus!
    Ezt nem is Miki küldte! - Ja, lehet, hogy én értettem félre. - This was not sent by Miki! - Oh, then I must have misunderstood it.

Synonyms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. already

Expression[edit]

ne ja

  1. not yet

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ja

  1. rōmaji reading of じゃ
  2. rōmaji reading of ジャ

Latvian[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ja

  1. if

Lithuanian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ja f

  1. (third-person singular) instrumental form of ji.

Lojban[edit]

Cmavo[edit]

ja (rafsi jav)

  1. (conjunction) or, and/or. Joins two predicate words (selbri) into a compound predicate (which is also a selbri).

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *(j)a, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronoun[edit]

ja sg

  1. I

Declension[edit]


Lule Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jahw (and); compare Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌷 (jah), Old High German ja, joh.

Conjunction[edit]

ja

  1. and

North Frisian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ja

  1. (Sylt and Mooring) they

Synonyms[edit]

  • djo (Heligolandic)
  • jo (Amrum and Fering)
  • (Halligen, Hoorning and Wiedingharde)

Northern Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jahw (and); compare Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌷 (jah), Old High German ja, joh.

Conjunction[edit]

ja

  1. and

Norwegian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. yes

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin iam

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. already
  2. as soon as possible
  3. quickly
  4. (with "ne") never

References[edit]


Pite Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jahw (and); compare Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌷 (jah), Old High German ja, joh.

Conjunction[edit]

ja

  1. and

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *(j)azъ, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ja

  1. I

Declension[edit]

singular plural
nominative ja my
genitive mnie nas
dative mnie / mi nam
accusative mnie nas
instrumental mną nami
locative mnie nas

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *(j)a, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

(Cyrillic spelling ја̑)

  1. I
    Ja sam učio. — I have studied.
  2. me
    Ovo sam ja. — This is me.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German ja.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

(Cyrillic spelling ја̏)

  1. (colloquial, regional) yes, yeah

Silesian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ja

  1. yes

Antonyms[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *(j)a, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronoun[edit]

ja

  1. I (first person singular)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Following prepositions, ma and mi are replaced by mňa and mne respectively.

See also[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German ja.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

  1. (informal) yes

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ja

  1. Representation of laughter, ha
    Also used repeatedly:
    • jaja, jajaja

Swahili[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Bantu. Compare Zulu -za.

Verb[edit]

ja

  1. to come

Conjugation[edit]



Usage notes[edit]

  • Has an irregular imperative form:

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *ja.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ja (not comparable)

  1. yes

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ja n

  1. a yes, an aye; a positive answer or vote

Declension[edit]


Tswana[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Bantu. Cognate with Swahili kula, Zulu dla.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

go ja (past jelê)

  1. to eat

Tz'utujil[edit]

Article[edit]

ja

  1. the

Alternative forms[edit]


Upper Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *(j)a, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronoun[edit]

ja

  1. I