jar

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See also: JAR and jár

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French jarre, from Arabic جره (jarrah, earthern receptacle).

Noun[edit]

jar (plural jars)

  1. A small, approximately cylindrical container, normally made of glass or clay, for holding fruit, preserves, etc., or for ornamental purposes.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown; perhaps imitative.

Verb[edit]

jar (third-person singular simple present jars, present participle jarring, simple past and past participle jarred)

  1. (transitive) To knock or strike sharply.
    He hit it with a hammer, hoping he could jar it loose.
  2. (transitive) To shock or surprise.
    I think the accident jarred him, as he hasn't gotten back in a car since.
  3. (of the form, style, appearance, etc. of people and things) To look strangely different; to stand out awkwardly from its surroundings; to be incongruent.
  4. To give forth a rudely quivering or tremulous sound; to sound harshly or discordantly.
    The notes jarred on my ears.
    • Shakespeare:
      When such strings jar, what hope of harmony?
    • Roscommon:
      A string may jar in the best master's hand.
  5. To act in opposition or disagreement; to clash; to interfere; to quarrel; to dispute.
    • Spenser:
      When those renowned noble peers Greece / Through stubborn pride among themselves did jar.
    • Milton:
      For orders and degrees / Jar not with liberty, but well consist.

Noun[edit]

jar (plural jars)

  1. A shake.
  2. A sense of alarm or dismay.
  3. (now rare) Discord, contention; quarrelling.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.ii:
      He maketh warre, he maketh peace againe, / And yet his peace is but continuall iarre [...].
    • 1612, John Smith, Proceedings, in Kupperman 1988, page 122:
      To redresse those jarres and ill proceedings, the Councell in England altered the governement and devolved the authoritie to the Lord De-la-ware.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (knock sharply): jolt
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

jar

  1. rafsi of jdari.

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Germanic *yōr-, from *yeh₁r-.

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Germanic *yōr-, from *yeh₁r-. Compare Old Saxon, Old Dutch jār, and Old English ġēar, Old Norse ár, Gothic 𐌾𐌴𐍂 (jēr).

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, whence also Old English, ġēar, Old Frisian jēr, Old High German and Old Dutch jār, Old Norse ár. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *yōr-, from *yeh₁r-.

Noun[edit]

jār n

  1. year

Declension[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jar m

  1. ravine, canyon

Declension[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *žarъ.

Noun[edit]

jar n (plural jaruri)

  1. burning coals
  2. intense heat, fire, glow

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *jarъ, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₂ros, from *yeh₁r-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jȃr m (Cyrillic spelling јар)

  1. (archaic, Croatia) spring
  2. swelter, intense heat (also figuratively)

Quotations[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *jarъ, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₂ros, from *yeh₁r-. Cognate with Serbo-Croatian јар/jar, dialectal Bulgarian and Russian яра. Non-Slavic cognates include Gothic 𐌾𐌴𐍂 (jēr, year).

Noun[edit]

jar f (genitive singular jari, nominative plural jari)

  1. spring (season)

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Tz'utujil[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Article[edit]

jar

  1. the