ego

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See also: Ego, égo, égő, and ego-

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ego (I). Chosen by Freud’s translator as a translation of his use of German Ich as a noun for this concept from the pronoun ich (I).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ego (plural egos)

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Wikipedia

  1. ​the self, especially with a sense of self-importance
    • 1998, Eckhart Tolle, A New Earth
      When every thought absorbs your attention completely, when you are so identified with the voice in your head and the emotions that accompany it that you lose yourself in every thought and every emotion, then you are totally identified with form and therefore in the grip of ego. Ego is a conglomeration of recurring thought forms and conditioned mental-emotional patterns that are invested with a sense of I, a sense of self.
  2. (psychology, Freudian) the most central part of the mind, which mediates with one's surroundings
    • 1954, Calvin S. Hall, “A Primer of Freudian Psychology”
      In the well adjusted person the ego is the executive of the personality and is governed by the reality principle.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ego (I).

Noun[edit]

ego n

  1. ego
  2. (psychoanalysis) ego

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

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Dutch[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ego n (plural ego's, diminutive egootje n)

  1. ego, self

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin egō (I).

Noun[edit]

ego

  1. ego
  2. (psychoanalysis) ego

Declension[edit]


Italian[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

ego m (invariable)

  1. ego

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ego or egō (first person, nominative, plural nos)

  1. I; first person singular personal pronoun, nominative case

Inflection[edit]

Irregular declension

Number Singular Plural
nominative ego nōs
genitive meī nostrī, nostrum
dative mihi nōbīs
accusative nōs
ablative nōbīs
vocative

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Aragonese: yo
  • Aromanian: iou
  • Asturian: yo
  • Catalan: jo
  • Dalmatian: ju
  • English: ego (loanword)
  • French: je
  • Friulian: jo
  • Galician: eu
  • Interlingua: io
  • Istro-Romanian: io
  • Italian: io
  • Neapolitan: i
  • Occitan:
    • Gascon: jo
    • Lengadocian: ieu
  • Old Provençal: eu, ieu
  • Portuguese: eu
  • Romanian: eu
  • Romansch: jau, eau
  • Sardinian: eo
  • Sicilian: iu
  • Spanish: yo
  • Vulgar Latin: eo
  • Walloon: dji

See also[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ego (I).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ego m (plural egos)

  1. ego (the self)
  2. (psychology) ego (most central part of the mind)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ego

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /êːɡo/
  • Hyphenation: e‧go

Noun[edit]

ȇgo m (Cyrillic spelling е̑го)

  1. ego

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

ego m (plural egos)

  1. ego

Related terms[edit]