eam

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See also: ΕΑΜ

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English eem, eme, from Old English ēam (maternal uncle), from Proto-Germanic *auhaimaz, *awahaimaz (maternal uncle), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwh₂os (maternal uncle, maternal grandfather). Cognate with Scots eme (uncle), West Frisian iem, omke (uncle), Dutch oom (uncle), German Ohm, Oheim (maternal uncle), Latin avunculus (maternal uncle). See uncle.

Noun[edit]

eam (plural eams)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Uncle.
    • 2011, Ernest R. Holloway, Andrew Melville and Humanism in Renaissance Scotland 1545-1622:
      James Melville remarked that during his uncle's time in Geneva he became “weill acquented with my eam, Mr. hendrie Scrymgeour” and was said to have been “a frequent visitor at his lodgings in town, and also at the Violet.

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Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

eam

  1. accusative feminine singular of ea

Verb[edit]

eam

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Contracted from earlier *ēahām, from Proto-Germanic *awahaimaz, from *awô (grandfather), Gothic 𐌰𐍅𐍉 (awō, grandmother); cognate with Latin avus (grandfather), avunculus (uncle); Russian dial. уй (uj, maternal uncle), Ukrainian вуй (vuj, uncle); all from Proto-Indo-European *awos, *h₂éwh₂os (maternal uncle, maternal grandfather)) + *haimaz (intimate, close). The word is cognate with Old Frisian ēm, Middle Dutch oom (Dutch oom), Old High German oheim (German Oheim, Ohm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ēam m

  1. uncle (especially maternal)
Declension[edit]
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Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *immi (I am), a form of *wesaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi (am). More at am.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

eam

  1. Alternative form of eom