initiative

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See also: Initiative

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French initiative, from Medieval Latin *initiativus (serving to initiate), from Late Latin initiare (to begin, Latin initiate), from Latin initium (beginning), from ineo (enter, begin).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

initiative (plural initiatives)

  1. A beginning; a first move.
  2. A new development; a fresh approach to something; a new way of dealing with a problem.
  3. The ability to act first or on one's own.
  4. An issue to be voted on, brought to the ballot by a sufficient number of signatures from among the voting public.

Synonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

initiative (not comparable)

  1. Serving to initiate; inceptive; initiatory; introductory; preliminary.
  2. In which voter initiatives can be brought to the ballot.
    • John G. Matsusaka, "Direct Democracy and the Executive Branch", in, 2008, Shaun Bowler and Amihai Glazer, editors, Direct Democracy's Impact on American Political Institutions, Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN 9780230604452, page 122 [1]:
      The second row shows that initiative states fill more constitutional offices by election than noninitiative states, and the difference is statistically significant after controlling for region and population.

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin *initiativus (serving to initiate), from Late Latin initiare (to begin, Latin initiate), from Latin initium (beginning), from ineo (enter, begin).

Noun[edit]

initiative f (plural initiatives)

  1. initiative
    • Prendre l'initiative.

External links[edit]