beat

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See also: Beat and béat

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English beten, from Old English bēatan (to beat, pound, strike, lash, dash, thrust, hurt, injure), from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to push, strike) (compare Low German boten, German boßen, Old Norse bauta), from Proto-Indo-European *bhau- (compare Old Irish fo·botha (he threatened), Latin confutō (I strike down), fūstis (stick, club), Albanian bahe (sling), Lithuanian baudžiù, Bulgarian бутам (butam, I beat, knock), Old Armenian բութ (butʿ)). Compare Occitan batre, French battre.

Noun[edit]

beat (plural beats)

  1. A stroke; a blow.
    • Dryden
      He, with a careless beat, / Struck out the mute creation at a heat.
  2. A pulsation or throb.
    a beat of the heart; the beat of the pulse
  3. A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
  4. A rhythm.
  5. (music) A transient grace note, struck immediately before the one it is intended to ornament.
  6. The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency
  7. A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect.
  8. The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.
    to walk the beat
    • 1886, Arthur Conan Doyle, chapter 3, A Study in Scarlet:
      There has been a bad business during the night at 3, Lauriston Gardens, off the Brixton Road. Our man on the beat saw a light there about two in the morning, and as the house was an empty one, suspected that something was amiss.
  9. (by extension) An area of a person's responsibility, especially
    1. In journalism, the primary focus of a reporter's stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
  10. (dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
  11. (archaic) A low cheat or swindler.
    a dead beat
  12. The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]
  • (piece of hip-hop music): track

Verb[edit]

beat (third-person singular simple present beats, present participle beating, simple past beat, past participle beaten or beat)

  1. (transitive) To hit; to knock; to pound; to strike.
    As soon as she heard that Wiktionary was shutting down, she went into a rage and beat the wall with her fists until her knuckles bled.
    • 2012 August 21, Pilkington, Ed, “Death penalty on trial: should Reggie Clemons live or die?”, The Guardian:
      In this account of events, the cards were stacked against Clemons from the beginning. His appeal lawyers have argued that he was physically beaten into making a confession, the jury was wrongfully selected and misdirected, and his conviction largely achieved on individual testimony with no supporting forensic evidence presented.
  2. (transitive) To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.
    He danced hypnotically while she beat the atabaque.
  3. (intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
    • Bible, Judges xix. 22
      The men of the city [] beat at the door.
    • Dryden
      Rolling tempests vainly beat below.
    • Longfellow
      They [winds] beat at the crazy casement.
    • Bible, Jonath iv. 8
      The sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and wished in himself to die.
    • Francis Bacon
      Public envy seemeth to beat chiefly upon ministers.
  4. (intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.
    • Byron
      A thousand hearts beat happily.
  5. (transitive) To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do better than, outdo, or excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.
    Jan had little trouble beating John in tennis. He lost five games in a row.
    No matter how quickly Joe finished his test, Roger always beat him.
    I just can't seem to beat the last level of this video game.
  6. (intransitive, nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
  7. (transitive) To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
    • 1955, Robin Jenkins, The Cone-Gatherers, Canongate 2012, p. 81:
      The part of the wood to be beaten for deer sloped all the way from the roadside to the loch.
  8. To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.
    Beat the eggs and whip the cream.
  9. (transitive, UK, In haggling for a price) of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price
    He wanted $50 for it, but I managed to beat him down to $35.
  10. (nonstandard) past participle of beat
    • 1825?, "Hannah Limbrick, Executed for Murder", in The Newgate Calendar: comprising interesting memoirs of the most notorious characters, page 231:
      Thomas Limbrick, who was only nine years of age, said he lived with his mother when Deborah was beat: that his mother throwed her down all along with her hands; and then against a wall []
  11. (transitive) To indicate by beating or drumming.
    to beat a retreat; to beat to quarters
  12. To tread, as a path.
    • Blackmore
      pass awful gulfs, and beat my painful way
  13. To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
    • John Locke
      Why should any one [] beat his head about the Latin grammar who does not intend to be a critic?
  14. To be in agitation or doubt.
    • Shakespeare
      to still my beating mind
  15. To make a sound when struck.
    The drums beat.
  16. (military, intransitive) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.
    The drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters.
  17. To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

beat (comparative more beat, superlative most beat)

  1. (US slang) exhausted
    After the long day, she was feeling completely beat.
  2. dilapidated, beat up
    Dude, you drive a beat car like that and you ain’t gonna get no honeys.
  3. (gay slang) fabulous
    Her makeup was beat!
  4. (slang) boring
  5. (slang, of a person) ugly
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From beatnik

Noun[edit]

beat (plural beats)

  1. A beatnik.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • DeLone et. al. (Eds.) (1975). Aspects of Twentieth-Century Music. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. ISBN 0130493465.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Adjective[edit]

beat m (feminine beata, masculine plural beats, feminine plural beates)

  1. saint, beatified

Noun[edit]

beat m (plural beats)

  1. monk

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English

Noun[edit]

beat m (plural beats, diminutive beatje n)

  1. A beat, rhythmic pulsation, notably in music

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

beat

  1. A beat (in music)

Declension[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English

Adjective[edit]

beat (invariable)

  1. beat (50s US literary and 70s UK music scenes)

Noun[edit]

beat m (invariable)

  1. beat (rhythm accompanying music)

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

beat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of beō

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bibitus 'drunk', from bibere (drink).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

beat 4 nom/acc forms

  1. drunk, drunken, intoxicated; tipsy

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

beat (plural beats)

  1. happiness

Declension[edit]