ugly

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ugly, uggely, uglike, from Old Norse uggligr (fearful, dreadful, horrible in appearance), from uggr (fear, apprehension, dread) (possibly related to agg (strife, hate)), equivalent to ug +‎ -ly. Cognate with Scots ugly, uglie, Icelandic ugglegur. Meaning softened to "very unpleasant to look at" around the late 14th century, and sense of "morally offensive" attested from around 1300.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ugly (comparative uglier, superlative ugliest)

  1. Displeasing to the eye; not aesthetically pleasing.
    • Spenser
      the ugly view of his deformed crimes
    • William Shakespeare
      O, I have passed a miserable night, / So full of ugly sights, of ghastly dreams.
  2. Displeasing to the ear or some other sense.
  3. Offensive to one's sensibilities or morality.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      All this was extraordinarily distasteful to Churchill. It was ugly, gross. Never before had he felt such repulsion when the vicar displayed his characteristic bluntness or coarseness of speech. In the present connexion—or rather as a transition from the subject that started their conversation—such talk had been distressingly out of place.
    He played an ugly trick on us.
  4. Ill-natured; crossgrained; quarrelsome.
    an ugly temper;  to feel ugly
  5. Unpleasant; disagreeable; likely to cause trouble or loss.
    an ugly rumour;  an ugly customer
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Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

ugly (countable and uncountable, plural uglies)

  1. (slang, uncountable) Ugliness.
  2. (slang) An ugly person or thing.
  3. (UK, informal, dated) A shade for the face, projecting from a bonnet.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Charles Kingsley to this entry?)