lag

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: låg

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lag

  1. late
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, King Richard III
      Some tardy cripple bore the countermand, / That came too lag to see him buried.
  2. (obsolete) Last; long-delayed.
    • Shakespeare
      the lag end of my life
  3. Last made; hence, made of refuse; inferior.
    • Dryden
      lag souls

Noun[edit]

lag (countable and uncountable, plural lags)

  1. (countable) A gap, a delay; an interval created by something not keeping up; a latency.
    • 2004, May 10. The New Yorker Online,
      During the Second World War, for instance, the Washington Senators had a starting rotation that included four knuckleball pitchers. But, still, I think that some of that was just a generational lag.
  2. (uncountable) Delay; latency.
    • 1999, Loyd Case, Building the ultimate game PC
      Whatever the symptom, lag is a drag. But what causes it? One cause is delays in getting the data from your PC to the game server.
    • 2001, Patricia M. Wallace, The psychology of the Internet
      When the lag is low, 2 or 3 seconds perhaps, Internet chatters seem reasonably content.
    • 2002, Marty Cortinas, Clifford Colby, The Macintosh bible
      Latency, or lag, is an unavoidable part of Internet gaming.
  3. (UK, slang, archaic) One sentenced to transportation for a crime.
  4. (UK, slang) a prisoner, a criminal.
    • 1934, P. G. Wodehouse, Thank You, Jeeves
      On both these occasions I had ended up behind the bars, and you might suppose that an old lag like myself would have been getting used to it by now.
  5. (snooker) A method of deciding which player shall start. Both players simultaneously strike a cue ball from the baulk line to hit the top cushion and rebound down the table; the player whose ball finishes closest to the baulk cushion wins.
  6. One who lags; that which comes in last.
    • Alexander Pope
      the lag of all the flock
  7. The fag-end; the rump; hence, the lowest class.
    • Shakespeare
      the common lag of people
  8. A stave of a cask, drum, etc.; especially (engineering) one of the narrow boards or staves forming the covering of a cylindrical object, such as a boiler, or the cylinder of a carding machine or steam engine.
  9. A bird, the greylag.

Usage notes[edit]

In casual use, lag and latency are used synonymously for “delay between initiating an action and the effect”, with lag more casual. In formal use, latency is the technical term, while lag is used when latency is greater than usual, particularly in internet gaming.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

lag (third-person singular simple present lags, present participle lagging, simple past and past participle lagged)

  1. to fail to keep up (the pace), to fall behind
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Canto I
      Behind her farre away a Dwarfe did lag, / That lasie seemd in being ever last, / Or wearied with bearing of her bag / Of needments at his backe.
    • 1616, George Chapman, The Odysseys of Homer
      Lazy beast! / Why last art thou now? Thou hast never used / To lag thus hindmost
    • 1717, The Metamorphoses of Ovid translated into English verse under the direction of Sir Samuel Garth by John Dryden, Alexander Pope, Joseph Addison, William Congreve and other eminent hands
      While he, whose tardy feet had lagg'd behind, / Was doom'd the sad reward of death to find.
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in seven parts
      Brown skeletons of leaves that lag / My forest-brook along
    • 2004, — The New Yorker, 5 April 2004
      Over the next fifty years, by most indicators dear to economists, the country remained the richest in the world. But by another set of numbers—longevity and income inequality—it began to lag behind Northern Europe and Japan.
  2. to cover (for example, pipes) with felt strips or similar material
    • c. 1974, Philip Larkin, The Building
      Outside seems old enough: / Red brick, lagged pipes, and someone walking by it / Out to the car park, free.
  3. (UK, slang, archaic) To transport as a punishment for crime.
    • De Quincey
      She lags us if we poach.
  4. (transitive) To cause to lag; to slacken.
    • Heywood
      To lag his flight.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch lachen.

Verb[edit]

lag (present lag, present participle laggende, past participle gelag)

  1. to laugh

Albanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *lauga, from Proto-Indo-European *loug- (compare Serbo-Croatian lȕža ‘puddle, pool’, Latvian luga ‘marshy deposit, silt’, Old Norse laug (hot spring, bath)).

Verb[edit]

lag (first-person singular past tense laga, participle lagur)

  1. to wet, moisten
  2. (colloquial) to water
  3. (geography) to wash land (of a body of water)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *lag-, from Proto-Indo-European *legh- 'to lay, lie (down)'. Cognate to Ancient Greek λόχος (lokhos, ambush, ambuscade, armed band ), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌲𐌾𐌰𐌽 (lagjan, to lay). Singular form of lagje.

Noun[edit]

lag m

  1. troop, band, encampment
Related terms[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lag.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /laːɡ/, [læːˀj], [læjˀ]

Noun[edit]

lag n (singular definite laget, plural indefinite lag)

  1. layer
  2. coat, coating
  3. class
  4. stratum

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lag

  1. singular past indicative of liggen

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lag n (genitive singular lags, plural løg)

  1. layer
  2. (in compounds) what belongs together (company, union)
  3. regularity, order
  4. skill, capability
  5. method, system
  6. importance
  7. mood
  8. design, shape
  9. melody

Usage notes[edit]

what belongs together

order

  • í lagi - in order, all right, ok

skill

importance

mood

  • tað er einki lag á honum - he is in a bad mood

Declension[edit]

n6 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lag lagið løg løgini
Accusative lag lagið løg løgini
Dative lag(i) lag(i)num løgum løgunum
Genitive lags lagsins laga laganna

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lag

  1. First-person singular indicative past form of liegen.
  2. Third-person singular indicative past form of liegen.

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

lag

  1. Romanization of 𐌻𐌰𐌲

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lag.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lag n

  1. layer
  2. song

Declension[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lac, from Proto-Celtic *laggo-, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leh₁g-, compare slack and Latin laxus (slack).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lag

  1. weak

Declension[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

lag

  1. rafsi of vlagi.

Maltese[edit]

Noun[edit]

lag m

  1. lake

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

lag n (definite singular laget; indefinite plural lag; definite plural laga/lagene)

  1. layer
    "Denne sjokoladen har et lag med hvitt lag utenpå." (This chocolate has a white outer layer.)
  2. team (group of people)
    "Jeg skal spille for et nytt lag i morgen siden jeg måtte bytte da jeg har flytta." (I'll be playing for a different team tomorrow as I've had to change because I moved."
  3. (rare, especially outside stock phrases) mood; very frequently found in the definite ("laget"), often preceded by "godt" (see below)
    "Han er i godt lag i dag." (He's having a good day. / He's happy. / He's happy today.)
  4. (quite rare) party; found mainly in the phrase "godt lag" meaning "good people", "good company" or "good party"
    "I godt lag spiller det ingen rolle hva man feirer, hvor eller hvordan." (Surrounded by friendly/good/nice people, it doesn't matter why you celebrate, or when or how.)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

lag n (definite singular laget, indefinite plural lag, definite plural laga)

  1. layer
  2. team (group of people)
  3. mood

Derived terms[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lēgaz (low).

Adjective[edit]

lāg (comparative lāgiro, superlative lāgist)

  1. low

Declension[edit]



Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sutsilvan) laitg
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) lai
  • (Puter) lej

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lacus.

Noun[edit]

lag m (plural lags)

  1. (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) lake

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lag

  1. weak, feeble

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish lagh, which is Old Norse lǫg (alternative spelling: lög). Cognate with Danish lov and Norwegian lov. English law is borrowed from Norse. Belongs to Old Norse leggja “to define”.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lag c

  1. a law; a written or understood rule that concerns behaviours and the appropriate consequences thereof. Laws are usually associated with mores.
  2. law; the body of written rules governing a society.
  3. a law; a one-sided contract.
  4. a law; an observed physical law.
  5. (mathematics) a law; a statement that is true under specified conditions.
Declension[edit]
Usage notes[edit]
  • In the expression vara någon till lags (to be of service to someone), this is an ancient genitive controlled by the preposition till (to)
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Swedish lagher (Old Norse lǫgr), from Proto-Germanic *laguz, from Proto-Indo-European *lakw-. Cognate with Latin lacus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lag c

  1. (cooking) a water-based solution of sugar, salt and/or other spices; e.g. brine
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Swedish lagh (Old Norse lag). Derived from Old Norse leggja “to lay” or liggja “to lie”.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lag n

  1. a workgroup, a team; group of people which in sports compete together versus another team; or in general, work closely together
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]