due

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See also: du'e and Due

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French deu (due), past participle of devoir (to owe), from Latin debere (to owe), from de (from) + habere (to have)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

due (comparative more due, superlative most due)

  1. Owed or owing.
    He is due four weeks of back pay.
    The amount due is just three quid.
    The due bills total nearly seven thousand dollars.
    He can wait for the amount due him.
  2. Appropriate.
    With all due respect, you're wrong about that.
    • Gray
      With dirges due, in sad array, / Slow through the churchway path we saw him borne.
  3. Scheduled; expected.
    Rain is due this afternoon.
    The train is due in five minutes.
    When is your baby due?
  4. Having reached the expected, scheduled, or natural time.
    The baby is just about due.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, The China Governess[1]:
      The huge square box, parquet-floored and high-ceilinged, had been arranged to display a suite of bedroom furniture designed and made in the halcyon days of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, when modish taste was just due to go clean out of fashion for the best part of the next hundred years.
  5. Owing; ascribable, as to a cause.
    The dangerously low water table is due to rapidly growing pumping.
    • J. D. Forbes
      This effect is due to the attraction of the sun.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 2, A Cuckoo in the Nest[2]:
      Mother [] considered that the exclusiveness of Peter's circle was due not to its distinction, but to the fact that it was an inner Babylon of prodigality and whoredom, from which every Kensingtonian held aloof, except on the conventional tip-and-run excursions in pursuit of shopping, tea and theatres.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

due (comparative more due, superlative most due)

  1. (used with compass directions) Directly; exactly.
    The river runs due north for about a mile.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

due (plural dues)

  1. Deserved acknowledgment.
    Give him his due — he is a good actor.
  2. (in plural dues) A membership fee.
  3. That which is owed; debt; that which belongs or may be claimed as a right; whatever custom, law, or morality requires to be done.
    • Shakespeare
      He will give the devil his due.
    • Tennyson
      Yearly little dues of wheat, and wine, and oil.
  4. Right; just title or claim.
    • Milton
      The key of this infernal pit by due [] I keep.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dúfa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /duːə/, [ˈd̥uːə], [ˈd̥uːu]

Noun[edit]

due c (singular definite duen, plural indefinite duer)

  1. pigeon
  2. dove

Derived terms[edit]

Inflection[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

du + -e

Adverb[edit]

due

  1. secondly

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

due f

  1. feminine past participle of devoir

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duo, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁.

Italian cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : due
    Ordinal : secondo
    Multiplier : doppio

Adjective[edit]

due m, f (invariable)

  1. two

Noun[edit]

due m (invariable)

  1. two

le due f pl

  1. two o'clock (a.m. or p.m.)

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Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

due

Noun[edit]

due f, m (definite singular dua/duen; indefinite plural duer; definite plural duene)

  1. dove, pigeon, culver (bird)

Hyponyms[edit]