devoir

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See also: devoirs

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French deveir (French devoir), from Latin debere (to owe)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

devoir (plural devoirs)

  1. (archaic) Duty, business; something which one must do.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, vol. 1 p. 149:
      he imprint not so much in his schollers mind [...] where Marcellus died, as because he was unworthy of his devoire he died there [...].
    • '"1787"', 'The History of Lady Emma Melcombe and her family' a novel by Winifred Marshall Gales, vol. 3. p. 155:
      I should have long ere this paid my devoirs to the inhabitants of Raymond Castle.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, vol. 1:
      Then quoth the portress to the mistress of the house, "O my lady, arise and go to thy place that I in turn may do my devoir."
    • 1983, Lawrence Durrell, Sebastian, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 1057:
      That is the little bit of essential information which enables us to complete our devoir – without it we are just ordinary people, dispossessed, taken unawares: the original sin!

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French deveir, from Latin dēbēre (must), present active infinitive of dēbeō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

devoir m (plural devoirs)

  1. duty
  2. exercise (set for homework)

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

devoir

  1. must, to have to (as a requirement)
  2. must, to do or have with certainty
  3. (transitive) to owe (money, obligation and etc)
  4. (literary, intransitive, in imperfect subjunctive, with inversion of subject) (even) though it be necessary (+ infinitive)
    • 1842, George Sand, Consuelo:
      Eh bien, se dit-elle, j'irai, dussé-je affronter les dangers réels [...]. ⇒ Well, she said to herself, I'll go, even if I have to face real danger.
  5. (reflexive, ~ à) to have a duty to

Conjugation[edit]

  • The past participle drops the circumflex accent in its other forms: feminine singular due; masculine plural dus; feminine plural dues.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin debere (to owe).

Verb[edit]

devoir

  1. to have to; must
  2. to owe

Conjugation[edit]

  • Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.
  • The past participle has the forms: feminine singular düe; masculine plural dus; feminine plural dües.

Noun[edit]

devoir m (oblique plural devoirs, nominative singular devoirs, nominative plural devoir)

  1. debt

References[edit]