lug

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See also: lúg, ług, Lug, and LUG

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Old Norse (compare Swedish lugga, Norwegian lugge). Noun is via Scots lugge, probably from Old Norse (compare Swedish and Norwegian lugg). Probably related to slug (lazy, slow-moving), which is from similar Scandinavian sources.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lug (plural lugs)

  1. The act of hauling or dragging.
    a hard lug
  2. That which is hauled or dragged.
    The pack is a heavy lug.
  3. Anything that moves slowly.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ascham to this entry?)
  4. A lug nut.
  5. (electricity) A device for terminating an electrical conductor to facilitate the mechanical connection; to the conductor it may be crimped to form a cold weld, soldered or have pressure from a screw.
  6. A part of something which sticks out, used as a handle or support.
  7. A fool, a large man.
  8. (UK) An ear or ear lobe.
  9. A wood box used for transporting fruit or vegetables.
  10. (slang) A request for money, as for political purposes.
    They put the lug on him at the courthouse.
  11. (UK, dialect) A rod or pole.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
  12. (UK, dialect) A measure of length equal to 16½ feet.
    • Spenser
      Eight lugs of ground.
  13. (nautical) A lugsail.
  14. (harness) The leather loop or ear by which a shaft is held up.
  15. A lugworm.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

lug (third-person singular simple present lugs, present participle lugging, simple past and past participle lugged)

  1. (transitive) To haul or drag along (especially something heavy); to carry.
    Why do you always lug around so many books?
    • Collier
      They must divide the image among them, and so lug off every one his share.
  2. (transitive) To run at too slow a speed.
    When driving up a hill, choose a lower gear so you don't lug the engine.
  3. (transitive, nautical) To carry an excessive amount of sail for the conditions prevailing.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [2]

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch lucht.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lug (uncountable, diminutive luggie)

  1. air

Usage notes[edit]

The plural form of lug is lugte, but it exists only in literary texts and is otherwise never used.


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *lug(ā), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leuK- 'to gulp/drink (down), swallow'. Cognate to Lithuanian liũgas (morass), Old Norse slok (trough, spillway), Middle High German slūch (gulf, abyss)[1]. Possibly related to Illyrian Loúgeon, a toponym denoting a swampy place in Strabo. Plural lugje.

Noun[edit]

lug m

  1. trough, (water)channel, spillway
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.245

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *lǫgъ.

Noun[edit]

lȗg m (Cyrillic spelling лу̑г)

  1. lye

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *lǫgъ.

Noun[edit]

lug m inan (??? please provide the genitive!, ??? please provide the nominative plural!)

  1. lye