haul

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English haulen, halen, halien (to drag, fetch, compel, summon), partly from Old English *halian, holian (to haul, drag); partly from Old French haler (to pull, haul), from Frankish *halōn (to haul, drag, fetch) or Old Dutch halen (to haul, drag, fetch); all from Proto-Germanic *halōną, *hulōną, *halēną (to call, fetch, summon), from Proto-Indo-European *kel(a)-, *kala- (to call, shout, sound). Cognate with Eastern Frisian halia (to get, fetch), Dutch halen (to fetch, bring, haul), Low German halen (to draw, pull), German holen (to get, fetch), Danish hale (to haul), Swedish hala (to haul, pull, tug, hale). Related also to Old English ġeholian (to get, obtain).

Verb[edit]

haul (third-person singular simple present hauls, present participle hauling, simple past and past participle hauled)

  1. To carry something; to transport something, with a connotation that the item is heavy or otherwise difficult to move.
  2. To pull or draw something heavy.
    • Denham
      Some dance, some haul the rope.
    • Alexander Pope
      Thither they bent, and hauled their ships to land.
  3. To transport by drawing, as with horses or oxen.
    to haul logs to a sawmill
    • Ulysses S. Grant
      When I was seven or eight years of age, I began hauling all the wood used in the house and shops.
  4. (nautical) To steer a vessel closer to the wind.
    • Cook
      I [] hauled up for it, and found it to be an island.
  5. (nautical, of the wind) To shift fore (more towards the bow).
  6. (figuratively) To pull.
    • 2012 April 21, Jonathan Jurejko, “Newcastle 3-0 Stoke”, BBC Sport:
      The 26-year-old has proved a revelation since his £10m move from Freiburg, with his 11 goals in 10 matches hauling Newcastle above Spurs, who went down to Adel Taarabt's goal in Saturday's late kick-off at Loftus Road.
  7. To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when yoked.

Derived terms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • (to steer closer to the wind): veer
  • (to shift aft): veer

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

haul (plural hauls)

  1. A long drive, especially transporting/hauling heavy cargo.
  2. An amount of something that has been taken, especially of fish or illegal loot.
    The robber's haul was over thirty items.
    The trawler landed a ten-ton haul.
  3. A pulling with force; a violent pull.
  4. (ropemaking) A bundle of many threads, to be tarred.
  5. Collectively, all of the products bought on a shopping trip.
  6. A haul video

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh heul, from Proto-Celtic *sāwol (compare Cornish howl, Breton heol; compare also Irish súil), from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /'haɨl/ (northern dialect)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

haul m (plural heuliau)

  1. sun

Derived terms[edit]