veer

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch vieren (to slacken).

Verb[edit]

veer (third-person singular simple present veers, present participle veering, simple past and past participle veered)

  1. (obsolete, nautical) To let out (a sail-line), to allow (a sheet) to run out.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, volume 12:
      As when a skilfull Marriner doth reed / A storme approching, that doth perill threat, / He will not bide the daunger of such dread, / But strikes his sayles, and vereth his mainsheat, / And lends vnto it leaue the emptie ayre to beat.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French virer.

Noun[edit]

veer (plural veers)

  1. A turn or swerve; an instance of veering.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

veer (third-person singular simple present veers, present participle veering, simple past and past participle veered)

  1. (intransitive) To change direction or course suddenly; to swerve.
    The car slid on the ice and veered out of control.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Dryden:
      And as he leads, the following navy veers.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Burke:
      An ordinary community which is hostile or friendly as passion or as interest may veer about.
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, “Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds”, New York Times:
      At this time in 2008, even as the global economy veered toward collapse, optimism about Washington ran surprisingly high.
  2. (intransitive, of the wind) To shift in a clockwise direction (if in the Northern Hemisphere, or in a counterclockwise direction if in the Southern Hemisphere).[1]
  3. (intransitive, nautical, of the wind) To shift aft.[1]
  4. (intransitive, nautical) To change direction into the wind; to wear ship.
  5. (transitive) To turn.
Antonyms[edit]
  • (of the wind, to shift clockwise): back
  • (of the wind, to shift aft): haul forward
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bowditch 2002

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A contraction of veder, from Middle Dutch vedere, from Old Dutch fethara, from Proto-Germanic *feþrō, from Proto-Indo-European *péth₂r̥ ~ pth₂én- (feather, wing), from *peth₂- (to fly). The sense "spring" is derived from the ability of feathers to resume their shape when bent.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

veer c (plural veren, diminutive veertje n)

  1. feather
  2. spring (e.g. metallic helix which resists stress)
Derived terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

veer

  1. first-person singular present indicative of veren
  2. imperative of veren

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch vere, from Old Dutch feri, from Proto-Germanic *farją. Derived from the verb Old Dutch *ferien (to ferry), from Proto-Germanic *farjaną. Compare German Fähre.

Noun[edit]

veer n (plural veren, diminutive veertje n)

  1. ferry
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately cognate to German vier.

Numeral[edit]

veer

  1. four (4)

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *veeri.

Noun[edit]

veer (??? please provide the genitive and partitive!)

  1. edge

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


German Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately cognate to German vier, English four.

Numeral[edit]

veer

  1. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) four (4)

See also[edit]

  • Plautdietsch: veea

Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

veer

  1. Alternative form of vëoir.

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vidēre, present active infinitive of videō, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to know; see).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

veer

  1. to see

Descendants[edit]

  • Galician: ver
  • Portuguese: ver