fief

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia en

Etymology[edit]

From Old French fief (whence also fee), from Medieval Latin fevum, a variant of feudum, from Old Frankish *fehu (cattle, livestock), from Proto-Germanic *fehu (cattle, sheep), from Proto-Indo-European *peku-, *peḱu- (sheep). See fee for cognates.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fief (plural fiefs)

  1. An estate held of a superior on condition of military service.
  2. Something over which one has rights or exercises control.
  3. (metaphor) An area of dominion, especially in a corporate or governmental bureaucracy.

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French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From Old French fief, borrowed from Medieval Latin fevum[1], a variant of feudum, from Old Frankish *fehu (cattle, livestock), from Proto-Germanic *fehu (cattle, sheep), from Proto-Indo-European *peku-, *peḱu- (sheep). Cognate with Old High German fihu (cattle, neat), Old English feoh (cattle, property, money). More at fee.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fief m (plural fiefs)

  1. fief

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jacqueline Picoche, Jean-Claude Rolland, Dictionnaire étymologique du français, Paris 2009, Dictionnaires Le Robert, ISBN 978-2-84902-424-9

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