drag

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English draggen (to drag), early Middle English dragen (to draw, carry), confluence of Old English dragan (to drag, draw, draw oneself, go, protract) and Old Norse draga (to draw, attract); both from Proto-Germanic *draganą (to draw, drag), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰerāgʰ- (to draw, drag). Verb sense influenced due to association with the noun drag (that which is hauled or dragged), related to Low German dragge (a drag-anchor, grapnel). Cognate with Danish drægge (to dredge), Danish drage (to draw, attract), Swedish dragga (to drag, drag anchor, sweep), Swedish draga (to draw, go), Icelandic draga (to drag, pull). More at draw.

Verb[edit]

drag (third-person singular simple present drags, present participle dragging, simple past and past participle dragged or, in some dialects, drug)

  1. (transitive) To pull along a surface or through a medium, sometimes with difficulty.
  2. (intransitive) To move slowly.
    Time seems to drag when you’re waiting for a bus.
  3. To act or proceed slowly or without enthusiasm; to be reluctant.
    • 2013 September-October, James R. Carter, “Flowers and Ribbons of Ice”, American Scientist: 
      Dragging yourself out of a warm bed in the early hours of a wintry morning to go for a hike in the woods: It’s not an easy thing for some to do, but the visual treasures that await could be well worth the effort. If the weather conditions and the local flora are just right, you might come across fleeting, delicate frozen formations sprouting from certain plant stems, literally a garden of ice.
  4. To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.
    • Byron
      The day drags through, though storms keep out the sun.
    • Gay
      Long, open panegyric drags at best.
  5. To draw along (something burdensome); hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.
    • Dryden
      have dragged a lingering life
  6. To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.
    • Russell
      A propeller is said to drag when the sails urge the vessel faster than the revolutions of the screw can propel her.
  7. (computing) To move (an item) on the computer display by means of a mouse or other input device.
    Drag the file into the window to open it.
  8. To unintentionally rub or scrape on a surface.
    The car's loose muffler was dragging on the road.
  9. To perform as a drag queen or drag king.
  10. (soccer) To hit or kick off target.
    • November 17 2012, BBC Sport: Arsenal 5-2 Tottenham [1]
      Arsenal were struggling for any sort of rhythm and Aaron Lennon dragged an effort inches wide as Tottenham pressed for a second.
  11. To fish with a dragnet.
  12. To break (land) by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow.
  13. (figuratively) To search exhaustively, as if with a dragnet.
    • Tennyson
      while I dragged my brains for such a song
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

drag (countable and uncountable, plural drags)

  1. (uncountable) Resistance of the air (or some other fluid) to something moving through it.
    When designing cars, manufacturers have to take drag into consideration.
  2. (countable, foundry) The bottom part of a sand casting mold.
  3. (countable) A device dragged along the bottom of a body of water in search of something, e.g. a dead body, or in fishing.
  4. (countable, informal) A puff on a cigarette or joint.
  5. (countable, slang) Someone or something that is annoying or frustrating; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.
    Travelling to work in the rush hour is a real drag.
    • J. D. Forbes
      My lectures were only a pleasure to me, and no drag.
  6. (countable, slang) Someone or something that is disappointing.
  7. (countable, slang) Horse-drawn wagon or buggy. [from mid-18th c.]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Thackeray to this entry?)
  8. (countable, slang) Street, as in 'main drag'. [from mid-19th c.]
  9. (countable) The scent-path left by dragging a fox, for training hounds to follow scents.
    to run a drag
  10. (countable, snooker) A large amount of backspin on the cue ball, causing the cue ball to slow down.
  11. A heavy harrow for breaking up ground.
  12. A kind of sledge for conveying heavy objects; also, a kind of low car or handcart.
    a stone drag
  13. (metallurgy) The bottom part of a flask or mould, the upper part being the cope.
  14. (masonry) A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.
  15. (nautical) The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel.
  16. Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; especially, a canvas bag with a hooped mouth (drag sail), so used.
  17. A skid or shoe for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel.
  18. Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.
    • Hazlitt
      Had a drag in his walk.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.
Particularly: “from German tragen wear or some relative?”

Noun[edit]

drag (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable, slang) Women's clothing worn by men for the purpose of entertainment. [from late 19th c.]
    He performed in drag.
  2. (uncountable, slang) Any type of clothing or costume associated with a particular occupation or subculture.
    corporate drag
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dorgъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

drag 4 nom/acc forms

  1. dear

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

This word can be used as a term of address, in the same way as "dear," "honey," and "sweetie" are used in English.

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dorgъ.

Adjective[edit]

drȃg (definite drȃgī, comparative drȁžī, Cyrillic spelling дра̑г)

  1. dear

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dorgъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

drág (comparative drážji, superlative nàjdrážji)

  1. dear (loved; lovable)
  2. expensive

Declension[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

drag n

  1. feature, trait, characteristic
  2. lure, trolling spoon
  3. (chess) move, stroke

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

drag

  1. imperative of draga.