dim

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See also: Dim and dim.

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

dim

  1. (mathematics) dimension

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English dim, dym, from Old English dim, dimm (dim, dark, gloomy; wretched, grievous, sad, unhappy), from Proto-Germanic *dimmaz (dark), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰem- (to whisk, smoke, blow; dust, haze, cloud; obscure). Compare Icelandic dimmur (dark) and dimma (darkness).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dim (comparative dimmer, superlative dimmest)

  1. Not bright or colorful.
    The lighting was too dim for me to make out his facial features.
  2. (colloquial) Not smart or intelligent.
    He may be a bit dim, but he's not retarded.
  3. Indistinct, hazy or unclear.
    His vision grew dimmer as he aged.
  4. Disapproving, unfavorable: rarely used outside the phrase take a dim view of.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

dim (third-person singular simple present dims, present participle dimming, simple past and past participle dimmed)

  1. (transitive) To make something less bright.
    He dimmed the lights and put on soft music.
  2. (intransitive) To become darker.
    The lights dimmed briefly when the air conditioning was turned on.
  3. To render dim, obscure, or dark; to make less bright or distinct; to take away the luster of; to darken; to dull; to obscure; to eclipse.
    • Dryden
      a king among his courtiers, who dims all his attendants
    • Cowper
      Now set the sun, and twilight dimmed the ways.
  4. To deprive of distinct vision; to hinder from seeing clearly, either by dazzling or clouding the eyes; to darken the senses or understanding of.
    • C. Pitt
      Her starry eyes were dimmed with streaming tears.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch duim.

Noun[edit]

dim

  1. thumb

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

dim

  1. rafsi of dimna.

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dimmr. Related to English dim and Icelandic dimmur.

Noun[edit]

dim (m and f), dimt (n), dimme (pl)

  1. dim
  2. to have bad vision
    Han er dim på synet
    His vision is dim/bad

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dȉm m (Cyrillic spelling ди̏м)

  1. smoke

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dìm m inan (genitive díma, uncountable)

  1. smoke

Declension[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dim

  1. any
  2. no, not, none

Noun[edit]

dim m

  1. anything
  2. nothing, none, nil

Particle[edit]

dim

  1. not

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dim ddim nim unchanged