hall

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See also: Hall and häll

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English halle, from Old English heall (hall, dwelling, house; palace, temple; law-court), from Proto-Germanic *hallō (hall), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to hide, conceal). Cognate with Scots hall, haw (hall), Dutch hal (hall), German Halle (hall), Swedish hall (hall), Icelandic höll (palace), Latin cella (room, cell), Sanskrit [script needed] (śā́lā, house, mansion, hall). [Devanagari needed]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall (plural halls)

  1. A corridor; a hallway.
    The drinking fountain was out in the hall.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 13, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      We tiptoed into the house, up the stairs and along the hall into the room where the Professor had been spending so much of his time.
  2. A meeting room.
    The hotel had three halls for conferences, and two were in use by the convention.
  3. A manor house (originally because a magistrate's court was held in the hall of his mansion).
    The duke lived in a great hall overlooking the sea.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)
  4. A building providing student accommodation at a university.
    The student government hosted several social events so that students from different halls would intermingle.
  5. The principal room of a secular medieval building.
  6. (obsolete) Cleared passageway through a crowd.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *(s)kel- (compare English shallow, Middle High German hel 'tired, weak', Ancient Greek skellein ‘to dry up’, sklēros ‘hard, harsh’)[1].

Noun[edit]

hall m (indefinite plural halle, definite singular halli, definite plural hallet)

  1. trouble

References[edit]

  1. ^ “hall” in Vladimir Orel (1998), Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Ledien, Boston, Köln: Brill Academic Publishers, page 141

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English hall.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall c (singular definite hallen, plural indefinite haller)

  1. hall (a corridor or a hallway)

Inflection[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *halla, from pre-finnic *šalna, from a Proto-Balto-Slavic language.

Noun[edit]

hall (genitive halla, partitive halla)

  1. frost
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Adjective[edit]

hall (genitive halli, partitive halli)

  1. grey (color)
Declension[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

hall (genitive halli, partitive halli)

  1. hall (large room or building)
  2. corridor, hallway
Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall m (plural halls)

  1. hall

External links[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

hall

  1. Imperative singular of hallen.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of hallen.

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɒlː/ (It is important to pronounce it with a long l, otherwise it will sound like hal (fish; to die).)
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Hungarian hadl 'hear'; related to Proto-Uralic *kule (compare with Finnish kuulla and Ter Sami kullɨd), but compare also Proto-Uralic *kuntele or *kuntalV (compare with Finnish kuunnella).

Verb[edit]

hall

  1. to hear
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English ‘hall’.

Noun[edit]

hall (plural hallok)

  1. lounge
Declension[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hǫll, from Proto-Germanic *hallō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel-. Compare English hall. Related to Latin cella and English cellar.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hall c

  1. a lounge
  2. a corridor
  3. short for any of the words:
    1. simhall
    2. ishall
    3. sporthall
    4. verkstadshall
    5. mässhall

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ hall in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)