trouble

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See also: troublé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Verb is from Middle English troublen, trublen, turblen, troble, from Old French troubler, trobler, trubler, metethetic variants of Old French tourbler, torbler, turbler, from Medieval Latin *turbulāre, from Latin turbula (disorderly group, a little crowd or people), diminutive of turba (stir, crowd). The noun is from Middle English truble, troble, from Old French troble, from the verb.


Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: trŭb'l; IPA(key): /ˈtɹʌbəl/, [ˈtɹʌbl̩]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

trouble (plural troubles)

  1. A distressful or dangerous situation.
    He was in trouble when the rain started.
  2. A difficulty, problem, condition, or action contributing to such a situation.
    • John Milton
      Lest the fiend [] some new trouble raise.
    • William Shakespeare
      Foul whisperings are abroad; unnatural deeds / Do breed unnatural troubles.
    The trouble was a leaking brake line.   The trouble with that suggestion is that we lack the funds to put it in motion.   The bridge column magnified the trouble with a slight tilt in the wrong direction.
  3. A violent occurrence or event.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      “I don't know how you and the ‘head,’ as you call him, will get on, but I do know that if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. […]”
    the troubles in Northern Ireland
  4. Efforts taken or expended, typically beyond the normal required.
    It's no trouble for me to edit it.
  5. A malfunction.
    He's been in hospital with some heart trouble.   My old car has engine trouble.
  6. Liability to punishment; conflict with authority.
    He had some trouble with the law.
  7. (mining) A fault or interruption in a stratum.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Verbs often used with "trouble": make, spell, stir up, ask for, etc.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

trouble (third-person singular simple present troubles, present participle troubling, simple past and past participle troubled)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To disturb, stir up, agitate (a medium, especially water).
    • Bible, John v. 4
      An angel went down at a certain season into the pool, and troubled the water.
    • Milton
      God looking forth will trouble all his host.
  2. (transitive) To mentally distress; to cause (someone) to be anxious or perplexed.
    • Bible, John xii. 27
      Now is my soul troubled.
    • Shakespeare
      Take the boy to you; he so troubles me / 'Tis past enduring.
    • John Locke
      Never trouble yourself about those faults which age will cure.
  3. (transitive) In weaker sense: to bother; to annoy, pester.
    Question 3 in the test is troubling me.
    I will not trouble you to deliver the letter.
  4. (reflexive or intransitive) To take pains to do something.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.26:
      Why trouble about the future? It is wholly uncertain.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Statistics[edit]

External links[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trouble m (plural troubles)

  1. trouble
  2. (medicine) disorder
    trouble bipolaire
    bipolar disorder

Verb[edit]

trouble

  1. first-person singular present indicative of troubler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of troubler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of troubler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of troubler
  5. second-person singular imperative of troubler

External links[edit]