mal

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Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French mal (illness).

Noun[edit]

mal (plural mals)

  1. (only in set phrases) illness, affliction.
    a grand mal seizure
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of malibu.

Noun[edit]

mal (plural mals)

  1. (surfing) A longboard (type of surfboard).

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Albanian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sq

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *mala, from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥Hdʰo (compare Old English molda ‘forehead’, Greek blythrós ‘lofty’, Avestan ka-mərɘðo ‘demon's head’). Semantic development went from ‘head’ to ‘summit’ (compare malë ‘tongue tip, tree top’) to ‘mountain’.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mal m (indefinite plural male, definite singular mali, definite plural malet)

  1. mount
  2. mountain

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from Albanian mal or related to it as a paleo-Balkanic substrate term. Compare Daco-Romanian mal.

Noun[edit]

mal

  1. shore
  2. pile, heap

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

mal

  1. Imperative of male.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mal f (plural mallen, diminutive malletje n)

  1. mold, cast (device to help creating shapes)

Adjective[edit]

mal (comparative maller, superlative malst)

  1. funny, crazy, lacking common sense

Usage notes[edit]

The adjective mal always refers to an aspect of a thing or person. It is the adjective form of the noun mallerd.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French mal, from Latin malus, derived from Proto-Indo-European *mel- (bad, wrong). Near cognates include Spanish malo and Italian male.

Noun[edit]

mal m (plural maux)

  1. trouble, difficulty
    J'ai du mal à m'imaginer cela. (“I have trouble imagining that.”)
  2. pain
    J'ai mal à la tête. (“I have a headache.” Literally, “I have pain at the head.”)
  3. evil
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French, from Latin male.

Adverb[edit]

mal

  1. badly
    C'est mal fait. (“It's done badly.”)

Adjective[edit]

mal

  1. (in set phrases and limited constructions) bad
    bon an, mal an
    bon gré, mal gré
    Il est mal de [infinitive]
    C'est mal de [infinitive]
Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin male.

Adverb[edit]

mal

  1. badly
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin malum.

Noun[edit]

mal m (plural males)

  1. misfortune
  2. bad; evil
  3. sickness

Etymology 3[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mal m sg

  1. (before the noun) apocopic form of malo

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mal

  1. times; indicating multiplication of two numbers
    sechs mal sieben ist zweiundvierzig
    six times seven is forty-two6 × 7 = 42
  2. (informal) short for einmal, once
  3. (colloquial) short for einmal, indicates that something is needed; can replace bitte in very informal situations
    Haben Sie ’ne Uhr? (’Do you have a clock?’) - Could be interpreted as an implication that the person asked is unreliable
    Haben Sie mal ’ne Uhr? - Indicates that the question is asked because the asker is in need of a clock rather than for other reasons
    Haste Feuer? (D’ya have fire? (i.e. a lighter)) - More likely to be asked when the asker has a lighter himself and wants to offer it
    Haste mal Feuer? - The asker needs a lighter but doesn’t have one.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mal

  1. Imperative singular of malen.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of malen.

External links[edit]

  • mal in Duden online

Guernésiais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mal, from Latin male.

Adverb[edit]

mal

  1. badly

Adjective[edit]

mal

  1. bad

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From mala (to purr).

Noun[edit]

mal n

  1. purr
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See malur.

Noun[edit]

mal

  1. indefinite accusative singular of malur

Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin malus

Adjective[edit]

mal (comparative plus mal, superlative le plus mal)

  1. bad
  2. evil

Adverb[edit]

mal (comparative plus mal, superlative le plus mal)

  1. badly, poorly
  2. wrongfully

Noun[edit]

mal (plural males)

  1. bad, badness, something bad
  2. evil
  3. illness
  4. pain, ache

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mal m (invariable)

  1. apocopic form of male

Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mal f

  1. home, house

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

mal

  1. rafsi of mabla.

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

mal m (plural maulx)

  1. bad act

Norwegian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mal m

  1. template

Novial[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mal

  1. bad

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin malus.

Adverb[edit]

mal

  1. evilly
  2. badly; poorly

Noun[edit]

mal m (oblique plural mals or max or maus, nominative singular mals or max or maus, nominative plural mal)

  1. evil
  2. pain, suffering

Descendants[edit]

  • French: mal (adverb and noun)

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin male (badly; wrongly).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mal

  1. badly

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese mal, from Latin male (badly; wrongly).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mal (comparatives mais mal, pior superlative o mais mal)

  1. badly (in a faulty, dysfunctional or incorrect manner)
    O carro está funcionando bem mal.
    The car is running pretty badly.
    João fala inglês mal.
    John speaks English badly.
  2. (preceding verbs) hardly; barely
    Ele mal consegue estudar com todo esse barulho.
    He can hardly study with all this noise.
  3. unfavourably (in an unfavourable manner)
    Penso mal de ti.
    I think unfavourably of you.
    Ele fala mal de ti.
    He speaks unfavourably of you.
  4. (in compounds) evilly
    mal-assombrado
    haunted (literally: evilly-shadowed)
    mal-agourado
    cursed (literally: evilly-foreboded)

Synonyms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

mal

  1. have/had just; have/had barely
    Mal saí quando a encontrei.
    I had barely gone out when I found her.

Noun[edit]

mal m (plural males)

  1. (uncountable) evil (malevolent forces or behaviour)
    As forças do mal cercaram o castelo.
    The forces of evil sieged the castle.
  2. malady (any ailment or disease, especially a lingering one)
    mal de Parkinson
    Parkinson’s disease
    Males como a SIDA e pneumonia são mortais.
    Illnesses such as AIDS and pneumonia are deadly.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dacian *mal-. Compare Aromanian mal, meal.

Noun[edit]

mal n (plural maluri)

  1. shore

Declension[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *malъ, from Proto-Indo-European *moh₁los.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mȃl (definite mȃlī, comparative mȁnjī, Cyrillic spelling ма̑л)

  1. small

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Apocopic form of malo, from Latin malus, derived from Proto-Indo-European *mel- (bad, wrong).

Adjective[edit]

mal m (apocopate, standard form malo)

  1. (before the noun) apocopic form of malo bad; evil
Usage notes[edit]

The adjective form mal is only used before a masculine singular noun. In other positions, malo is used instead.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin male.

Adverb[edit]

mal (comparative peor)

  1. badly; poorly

Noun[edit]

mal m (plural males)

  1. evil, harm; a bad thing or situation
    de mal en peor — “from bad to worse”

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mal c

  1. moth
  2. wels catfish (Silurus glanis)

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

mal

  1. imperative of mala.
  2. present tense of mala.

Related terms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic مال (māl, property).

Noun[edit]

mal

  1. assets
  2. (slang) stupid person
  3. (slang) prostitute