lam

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See also: Lam, Lam., l-am, làm, and lăm

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse lemja.

Noun[edit]

lam (uncountable)

  1. Used in the expression on the lam to mean that a person is fleeing law enforcement, possibly in hiding.

Verb[edit]

lam (third-person singular simple present lams, present participle lamming, simple past and past participle lammed)

  1. (transitive) To beat or thrash

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Arabic This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Noun[edit]

lam (plural lams)

  1. The twenty-third letter of the Arabic alphabet, . It is preceded by ك (k) and followed by م (m).

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse lami.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lam (neuter lamt, definite and plural lamme)

  1. lame

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lamb.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lam n (singular definite lammet, plural indefinite lam)

  1. lamb
Inflection[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch lamp, lam, from Old Dutch *lamb, from Proto-Germanic *lambaz. Cognate with lamb, German Lamm.

Noun[edit]

lam n (plural lammeren, diminutive lammetje n)

  1. A lamb, the young of a sheep
  2. (metonymically) The meat - or fleece/wool produce of a lamb; a dish prepared from lamb's meat
  3. (figuratively) A gentle person, especially an innocent child
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch *lam, from Proto-Germanic *lamaz. Cognate with lame, German lamm.

Adjective[edit]

lam (comparative lammer, superlative lamst)

  1. lame, unable to move, paralyzed
  2. (informal) very drunk
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hausa[edit]

Noun[edit]

lam f

  1. Letter of the Arabic alphabet: ل

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

lam

  1. rafsi of lamji.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse lami

Adjective[edit]

lam (neuter singular lamt, definite singular and plural lamme)

  1. paralysed, paralyzed (US), crippled
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lamb

Noun[edit]

lam n (definite singular lammet, indefinite plural lam, definite plural lamma or lammene)

  1. a lamb (young sheep)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

lam

  1. imperative of lamme

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse lami

Adjective[edit]

lam (neuter singular lamt, definite singular and plural lamme)

  1. paralysed, paralyzed (US), crippled

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lamb

Noun[edit]

lam n (definite singular lammet, indefinite plural lam, definite plural lamma)

  1. a lamb (young sheep)
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *laimą.

Noun[edit]

lām n

  1. clay, loam

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Common Proto-Germanic *lamaz, whence also Old English lama, Old Norse lami

Adjective[edit]

lam

  1. lame

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Noun[edit]

lam

  1. genitive plural of lama

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lam (comparative lamare, superlative lamast)

  1. lame, unable to move any limbs
  2. (slang) lame, inefficient, imperfect, almost ridiculously so
    Det var ett lamt försök. Gör ditt bästa istället!
    That was a lame attempt. Do your best instead!

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Sino-Vietnamese, from

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lam

  1. royal blue


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Arm and English arm.

Noun[edit]

lam (plural lams)

  1. arm
  2. blade
  3. sharp blade

Declension[edit]