lame

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See also: lamé

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English lama, from the Proto-Germanic *lama-, from Proto-Indo-European *lem- (to crush; fragile). [1] Akin to German lahm and Dutch lam, Old Norse lami, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian lam, akin to Old Church Slavonic ломити (lomiti, to break).

Adjective[edit]

lame (comparative lamer, superlative lamest)

  1. Unable to walk properly because of a problem with one's feet or legs.
  2. Moving with pain or difficulty on account of injury, defect or temporary obstruction of a function.
    a lame leg, arm or muscle
  3. (by extension) Hobbling; limping; inefficient; imperfect.
    • Barrow
      a lame endeavour
    • Shakespeare
      O, most lame and impotent conclusion!
  4. (slang) Unconvincing or unbelievable.
    He had a really lame excuse for missing the birthday party.
  5. (slang) Failing to be cool, funny, interesting or relevant.
    He kept telling these extremely lame jokes all night.
  6. (slang)

Strangely corny or sweet to an extent.

  1. "I told him not to bring me flowers, so he brought a bunch of carrots instead. It was lame but it made me smile"
Usage notes[edit]

Referring to a person without a disability as “lame” is offensive to many as it suggests a derogatory characterization of the physical condition from which the term was derived.

Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

lame (third-person singular simple present lames, present participle laming, simple past and past participle lamed)

  1. (transitive) to cause a person or animal to become lame
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty: And if you don't want to lame your horse you must look sharp and get them [stones stuck in hooves] out quickly.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 6
      Now her soul felt lamed in itself. It was her hope that was struck.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French lame, from Latin lamina.

Noun[edit]

lame (plural lames)

  1. A lamina.
  2. (in the plural) A set of joined, overlapping metal plates.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

lame (third-person singular simple present lames, present participle laming, simple past and past participle lamed)

  1. (obsolete) To shine.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Piers Plowman to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pokorny 2365.

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lame (??? please provide the genitive and partitive!)

  1. flat

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lamina, possibly through the diminutive intermediate lamella. Compare Italian lama.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lame f (plural lames)

  1. lamina
  2. blade
  3. wave

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lamina. Compare Romansh loma, lama, French lame, Italian and Venetian lama.

Noun[edit]

lame f (plural lamis)

  1. blade

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the English adjective lame.

Adjective[edit]

lame

  1. (slang) boring; unimpressive
  2. (slang) unskilled; useless
    Ich wollte nicht sagen, dass das was die machen total lame ist.
    I didn’t want to say that what they are doing is totally lame.

External links[edit]

  • lame in Duden online

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

lame f

  1. plural form of lama

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

lame f (oblique plural lames, nominative singular lame, nominative plural lames)

  1. blade (of a weapon)

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

lame

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of lamer.
    ¡Lame! — “Lick!”
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of lamer.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of lamer.
    Lame. — “[He/she/it] licks.”

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lame

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of lam.