dolent

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dolent, from Latin dolēntem, present participle of dolēre (to grieve).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dolent (comparative more dolent, superlative most dolent)

  1. (archaic) Sad, sorrowful.
    • 1874, James Thomson, The City of Dreadful Night
      Poor wretch! who once hath paced that dolent city
      Shall pace it often, doomed beyond all pity,
      With horror ever deepening from the first.
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 148:
      ‘Did you find them all, Uncle Van?’ she inquired, sighing, laying her dolent head on his shoulder.

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Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Eastern) IPA(key): /duˈɫen/
  • (Western) IPA(key): /doˈɫent/

Adjective[edit]

dolent m (feminine dolenta, masculine plural dolents, feminine plural dolentes)

  1. bad

Verb[edit]

dolent

  1. present participle of doldre

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French dolent

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dolent m (feminine dolente, masculine plural dolents, feminine plural dolentes)

  1. (archaic) mournful

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dolent

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of doleō

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dolent

  1. painful; causing suffering and pain

Declension[edit]

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Descendants[edit]