moral

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See also: Moral and morâl

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French moral, from Latin mōrālis (relating to manners or morals) (first used by Cicero, to translate Ancient Greek ἠθικός (ēthikós, moral)), from mos (manner, custom).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moral (comparative more moral, superlative most moral)

  1. Of or relating to principles of right and wrong in behaviour, especially for teaching right behaviour.
    moral judgments;  a moral poem
    • Nathaniel Hawthorne
      She had wandered without rule or guidance in a moral wilderness.
  2. Conforming to a standard of right behaviour; sanctioned by or operative on one's conscience or ethical judgment.
    • Sir M. Hale
      the wiser and more moral part of mankind
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, The Celebrity:
      The stories did not seem to me to touch life. They were plainly intended to have a bracing moral effect, and perhaps had this result for the people at whom they were aimed. They left me with the impression of a well-delivered stereopticon lecture, with characters about as life-like as the shadows on the screen, and whisking on and off, at the mercy of the operator.
    a moral obligation
  3. Capable of right and wrong action.
    a moral agent
  4. Probable but not proved.
    a moral certainty
  5. Positively affecting the mind, confidence, or will.
    a moral victory;  moral support

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

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Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

moral (plural morals)

  1. (of a narrative) The ethical significance or practical lesson.
    The moral of the The Boy Who Cried Wolf is that if you repeatedly lie, people won't believe you when you tell the truth.
    • Macaulay
      We protest against the principle that the world of pure comedy is one into which no moral enters.
  2. Moral practices or teachings: modes of conduct.
  3. (obsolete) A morality play.

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle French and Old French moral, from Latin moralis

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moral m (plural morals)

  1. morale, optimism

Adjective[edit]

moral m (feminine morale, masculine plural moraux, feminine plural morales)}

  1. moral

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moral m (plural morai, feminine morala, feminine plural morales)

  1. moral

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin moralis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moral m, f (plural morais; comparable)

  1. moral

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mǒraːl/
  • Hyphenation: mo‧ral

Noun[edit]

mòrāl m (Cyrillic spelling мо̀ра̄л)

  1. (uncountable) moral

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moral m, f (plural morales)

  1. moral

Antonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

moral f (plural morales)

  1. moral
  2. (tree): mulberry

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Loan from French morale via German Moral, used in Swedish in Then Swänska Argus (1730s).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moral c

  1. morale, character
  2. moral, moral practices, conduct
    snäv, viktoriansk moral
    strict, Victorian moral
  3. a moral, a lesson (of a narrative)

Declension[edit]

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