probable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French probable, from Latin probābilis (that may be proved, credible), from probare (to test, examine); see probe, prove.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

probable (comparative more probable, superlative most probable)

  1. Likely or most likely to be true.
    It's probable that it will rain tomorrow.
    The probable source of the failure was the mass of feathers in the intake manifold.
  2. Likely to happen.
    With all the support we have, success is looking probable.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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See also[edit]

External links[edit]



Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin probābilis.

Adjective[edit]

probable (epicene, plural probables)

  1. probable

Antonyms[edit]

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin probābilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

probable m, f (masculine and feminine plural probables)

  1. probable

Antonyms[edit]

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin probābilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

probable (masculine and feminine, plural probables)

  1. probable (all meanings)

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Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin probābilis.

Adjective[edit]

probable m, f (plural probables)

  1. probable

Antonyms[edit]

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Ido[edit]

Adverb[edit]

probable

  1. probably

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin probābilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

probable m, f (plural probables)

  1. probable, likely
  2. provable

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]