hale

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See also: Hale, halé, halę, and hâlé

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hǣlu, hǣl, from a noun-derivative of Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, healthy).

Noun[edit]

hale (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Health, welfare.
    • Spenser
      All heedless of his dearest hale.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Representing a Northern dialectal form of Old English hāl (whole), perhaps influenced by Old Norse heill (Webster's suggests ‘partly from Old English, partly from Old Norse’), both from Proto-Germanic *hailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kóh₂ilus (healthy, whole). Compare whole, hail (adjective).

Adjective[edit]

hale (comparative haler, superlative halest)

  1. Sound, entire, healthy; robust, not impaired.
    • Jonathan Swift
      Last year we thought him strong and hale.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn."
      "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
Antonyms[edit]
Usage notes[edit]
  • Now rather uncommon, except in the stock phrase "hale and hearty".
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English halen, from Anglo-Norman haler, from Old Dutch *halon (compare Dutch halen), from Proto-Germanic *halōną (compare Old English geholian, West Frisian helje, German holen), from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- ‘to lift’ (compare Latin excellere ‘to surpass’, Tocharian B käly- ‘to stand, stay’, Albanian qell (to halt, hold up, carry), Lithuanian kélti ‘to raise up’, Ancient Greek κελέοντες (keléontes) ‘upright beam on a loom’). Doublet of haul.

Verb[edit]

hale (third-person singular simple present hales, present participle haling, simple past and past participle haled)

  1. To drag, pull, especially forcibly.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.6:
      For I had beene vilely hurried and haled by those poore men, which had taken the paines to carry me upon their armes a long and wearysome way, and to say truth, they had all beene wearied twice or thrice over, and were faine to shift severall times.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound, act 1
      The wingless, crawling hours, one among whom
      As some dark Priest hales the reluctant victim
      Shall drag thee, cruel King, to kiss the blood
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, p. 262:
      They will hale the King to Paris, and have him under their eye.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hali.

Noun[edit]

hale c (singular definite halen, plural indefinite haler)

  1. tail, brush, scut
  2. bottom, fanny
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From late Old Norse hala, from Middle Low German halen.

Verb[edit]

hale (imperative hal, infinitive at hale, present tense haler, past tense halede, past participle har halet)

  1. haul, heave, pull
  2. drag

External links[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of halen

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of halar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of halar

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *fale, from Proto-Oceanic *pale, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

Noun[edit]

hale

  1. house, building
  2. institution
  3. lodge
  4. station, hall
  5. host, hospitable person

Jèrriais[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hali

Noun[edit]

hale m (definite singular halen, indefinite plural haler, definite plural halene)

  1. a tail (of an animal, aircraft, comet etc.)

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hali

Noun[edit]

hale m (definite singular halen, indefinite plural halar, definite plural halane)

  1. a tail (of an animal, aircraft, comet etc.)

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hale f

  1. nominative plural of hala
  2. accusative plural of hala
  3. vocative plural of hala

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. third-person singular imperative of halar