sain

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See also: säin

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English seġnian, from Latin signō, from signum.[1][2] Cognate to German segnen, Irish séan (sign, omen) and Scottish Gaelic seun (a charm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sain (third-person singular simple present sains, present participle saining, simple past and past participle sained)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To make the sign of the cross on or over something or someone.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete except in Scots) To make the sign of the cross.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To bless, to keep from evil influence.
    • 1983, Robert Nye, The Facts of Life:
      The child was sained then. Fir candles were lighted and whirled round the bed in which mother and infant lay.

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ sain” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  2. ^ sain” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online

Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sain

  1. First-person singular indicative past form of saada.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French, from Latin sanus

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sain m (feminine saine, masculine plural sains, feminine plural saines)

  1. healthy; in good health

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

sain

  1. Alternative form of seien.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin sanus

Adjective[edit]

sain m (feminine saine)

  1. healthy; in good health

Descendants[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sursilvan) sein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) sagn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sinus (compare French sein, Italian seno, Romanian sân, Spanish seno).

Noun[edit]

sain m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, anatomy) breast (of a woman)

Related terms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) pèz
  • (Sutsilvan) péz
  • (Puter, Vallader) pet

Scots[edit]

From Middle English (whence also English sain), from Old English, from Latin. Cognate to Scottish Gaelic seun (a charm).

Verb[edit]

sain

  1. to bless or consecrate
  2. to make the sign of the cross, to genuflect