pole

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See also: Pole and pôle

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pole, pal, from Old English pāl (a pole, stake, post; a kind of hoe or spade), from Proto-Germanic *palaz, *pālaz (pole), from Latin pālus (stake, pale, prop, stay) from Old Latin *paglus, from Proto-Indo-European *pāǵe- (to nail, fasten). Cognate with Scots pale, paill (stake, pale), North Frisian pul, pil (stake, pale), Saterland Frisian Pool (pole), West Frisian poal (pole), Dutch paal (pole), German Pfahl (pile, stake, post, pole), Danish pæl (pole), Swedish påle (pole), Icelandic páll (hoe, spade, pale), Old English fæc (space of time, while, division, interval; lustrum).

Noun[edit]

pole (plural poles)

  1. Originally, a stick; now specifically, a long and slender piece of metal or (especially) wood, used for various construction or support purposes.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      For a spell we done pretty well. Then there came a reg'lar terror of a sou'wester same as you don't get one summer in a thousand, and blowed the shanty flat and ripped about half of the weir poles out of the sand.
  2. (fishing) A type of basic fishing rod.
  3. A long fiberglass sports implement used for pole-vaulting.
  4. (slang, spotting) A telescope used to identify birds, aeroplanes or wildlife.
  5. (historical) A unit of length, equal to a perchchain or 5½ yards).
  6. (auto racing) Pole position.
  7. (analysis) a singularity that behaves like \frac{1}{z^n} at z = 0
Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

pole (third-person singular simple present poles, present participle poling, simple past and past participle poled)

  1. To propel by pushing with poles, to push with a pole.
    Huck Finn poled that raft southward down the Mississippi because going northward against the current was too much work.
  2. To identify something quite precisely using a telescope.
    He poled off the serial of the Gulfstream to confirm its identity.
  3. (transitive) To furnish with poles for support.
    to pole beans or hops
  4. (transitive) To convey on poles.
    to pole hay into a barn
  5. (transitive) To stir, as molten glass, with a pole.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French pole, pôle, and its source, Latin polus, from Ancient Greek πόλος (pólos, axis of rotation).

Noun[edit]

pole (plural poles)

  1. Either of the two points on the earth's surface around which it rotates; also, similar points on any other rotating object.
  2. A point of magnetic focus, especially each of the two opposing such points of a magnet (designated north and south).
  3. (geometry) A fixed point relative to other points or lines.
  4. (electricity) A contact on an electrical device (such as a battery) at which electric current enters or leaves.
  5. (complex analysis) For a meromorphic function f(z): a point a for which f(z) \rightarrow \infty as z \rightarrow a.
    The function f(z) = \frac{1}{z-3} has a single pole at z = 3.
  6. (obsolete) The firmament; the sky.
    • Milton
      shoots against the dusky pole
Antonyms[edit]
  • (complex analysis): zero
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

pole (third-person singular simple present poles, present participle poling, simple past and past participle poled)

  1. (transitive) To induce piezoelectricity in (a substance) by aligning the dipoles.

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pole n

  1. (agriculture) field
  2. (physics) field
  3. (algebra) field
  4. (computing) field
  5. (programming) array

Synonyms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

pole

  1. in Polish

Estonian[edit]

Contraction[edit]

pole

  1. ei ole

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pollen.

Noun[edit]

pole m (plural poles)

  1. pollen
  2. (auto racing) Pole position.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See pulir.

Verb[edit]

pole

  1. A form of of pulir

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

pole

  1. vocative singular of polus

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pole n

  1. field (land area; wide open space)
  2. (geometry) area
  3. (physics) field

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pole m (plural poles)

  1. (auto racing) Pole position.
Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pole

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of polir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of polir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of polir.

Swahili[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pole

  1. slow (not quick in motion)


This Swahili entry was created from the translations listed at slow. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see pole in the Swahili Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) July 2009