propel

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Historically (late Middle English) meant "expel, drive out". From Latin propellō, from pro- "forward" and pellō (push, move).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

propel (third-person singular simple present propels, present participle propelling, simple past and past participle propelled)

  1. To cause to move in a certain direction.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter V
      When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to propel it, and when it stood erect, it sat upon its tail.
  2. To make to arrive to a certain situation or result.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 265e.
      I can discern your nature and see that even without any arguments (logoi) from me it will propel you to what you say you are drawn towards,

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Danish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English propeller.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /propɛl/, [pʰʁ̥oˈpɛlˀ]

Noun[edit]

propel c (singular definite propellen, plural indefinite propeller)

  1. propeller (mechanical device used to propel)

Inflection[edit]

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