sist

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See also: síst

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin sistō (I bring to a stand, stop).

Verb[edit]

sist (third-person singular simple present sists, present participle sisting, simple past and past participle sisted)

  1. (law, Scotland) To stay (e.g. judicial proceedings); to delay or suspend; to stop
  2. (law, Scotland) to cause to take a place, as at the bar of a court; hence, to cite; to summon; to bring into court
    • Sir W. Hamilton
      Some, however, have preposterously sisted nature as the first or generative principle.

Noun[edit]

sist (plural sists)

  1. (law, Scotland) a stay or suspension of proceedings
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burril to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sist

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of sissen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of sissen

Kurdish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sist

  1. weak

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The origin of this word is not entirely clear. It has been compared with Ancient Greek κεντέω (kentéō, to prick, to pierce), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱent- (to pierce): its zero grade *ḱn̥t would have yielded Proto-Baltic *šint-, whence Latvian sīt-, probably the stem of archaic term sīts (hunting spear). This hypothesis, however, does not explain the short i in the present stem sit- (with the s in the infinitive from *sit-ti > sist). A possibly better hypothesis is to derive sist from Proto-Indo-European *sey- (to stretch one's arm; tension, strength): its zero grade *si- would have yielded Proto-Baltic *sit- with an extra t, whence sit-ti > sist. The meaning would have changed from “to flex one's muscles” to “to use one's muscles (to hit),” whence “to hit.”[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Verb[edit]

sist tr. or intr., 1st conj., pres. situ, sit, sit, past situ

  1. (intransitive) to hit, beat (move a body part or an object in order to touch so as to inflict pain, injury or death; to hit in order to change or direct an object )
    sist uzbrucējam — to hit the attacker
    sist bērnam pa pirkstiem — to hit a child on the fingers
    sist zirgam ar pātagu — to hit a horse with a whip
    Uldis sita... sitiens bija ass, spēcīgs un precīzs: trāpīja taisni sejā — Uldis hit... the hit was sharp, strong and precise: straight in the face
    jūs man nekādā ziņā nesistu, ja riskētu vienas pļaukas vietā pretī saņemt divas — you would never hit me, if you risked to get two slaps for every one you give
  2. (transitive) to hit, beat (something)
    sist mušas — to hit (and kill) flies
    sist ar pātagu zāli — to hit the grass with a whip
    sist nost, zemē — to kill (lit. to strike down, to the ground)
    te ļaudis sita, līdz asinīm — here they beat people, till they bleed
    meitene kliedza, vaimanāja, skrēja cūkai priekšā, sita to ar stibu — the girl screamed, howled, ran to the pig (and) hit it with a cane
  3. (colloquial, in armed combat) to hit (to attack, defeat the enemy)
    mūsu karstākā vēlēšanās bija sist ienaidnieku tā, lai to pēc iespējas ātrāk padzītu no mūsu teritorijas — our most ardent desire was to hit the enemy so as to drive him out of our territory as soon as possible
  4. (transitive) to hit, beat (move a body part or an object in order to touch in order to change or direct an object in a desirable way, or to obtain a certain effect, to make noise, etc.)
    sist ar āmuru kaļamo dzelzi — to hit malleable iron with a hammer
    sist bumbu ar kāju — to hit the ball (with one's foot)
    sist dēlī naglas — to hit (= drive) the nails in(to) the board
    pie kantora puiši sita volejbolu — near the office the boys were hitting (= playing) volleyball
    zirgu pakavi sit ielas bruģu akmeņus caurām dienām — the horse hooves hit the street pavement all day long
  5. (transitive) to hit, to break (to cause something to split or shatter)
    sist traukus, stiklu — to hit (= break) dishes, glass
    Zenta rosījās pie plīts un sita olas — Zenta was busy at the stove and (she) hit (= broke) (some) eggs
  6. (in table or card games) to hit, to get (to obtain a piece or card from one's opponent, according to the rules of the game)
    sist laidni — to hit (= get) (the opponent's) bishop (in chess)
    sist kārava dūzi — to hit (= get) (the opponent's) ace of diamonds

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:

References[edit]

  1. ^ “sist” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (Rīga: AVOTS) ISBN: 9984-700-12-7.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sist

  1. last (final)

Adverb[edit]

sist

  1. last, lastly

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse síðastr.

Adjective[edit]

sist (indefinite singular sist, definite singular and plural siste)

  1. last
    Dette er siste gongen eg gjer dette, vonar eg.
    This is the last time that I am doing this, I hope.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse sízt.

Adverb[edit]

sist

  1. last
    Kven kom sist?
    Who came last?

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

sist

  1. past participle of seoir

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sist

  1. last (final)

Adverb[edit]

sist

  1. last, lastly