hue

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See also: hué, Hue, Hué, Huë, and Huế

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hewe, from Old English hīew, hīw (appearance, form, species, kind; apparition; hue, color; beauty; figure of speech), from Proto-Germanic *hiwją (hue, form, shape, appearance; mildew), from Proto-Indo-European *kew-, *ḱew- (skin, colour of the skin) or Proto-Indo-European *ḱey- (grey, dark shade). Cognate with Swedish hy (complexion, skin), Norwegian hy (fluff, mold, skin), Icelandic góma (vanity), Gothic [script?] (hiwi, form, show, appearance). Compare also Sanskrit [script?] (chavī, cuticle, skin, hide; beauty, splendour); Irish céo (fog), Tocharian B black, dark grey (kwele), Lithuanian šývas (light grey), Albanian thinjë (grey), Sanskrit [script?] (śyāvá, brown). [Devanagari?]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • hew (obsolete)

Noun[edit]

hue (plural hues)

  1. (obsolete) Form; appearance; guise.
  2. A color, or shade of color, blee; tint; dye.
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde
      A great chocolate-coloured pall lowered over heaven, but the wind was continually charging and routing these embattled vapours; so that as the cab crawled from street to street, Mr. Utterson beheld a marvelous number of degrees and hues of twilight; for here it would be dark like the back-end of evening; and there would be a glow of a rich, lurid brown, like the light of some strange conflagration; and here, for a moment, the fog would be quite broken up, and a haggard shaft of daylight would glance in between the swirling wreaths.
  3. The characteristic related to the light frequency that appears in the color, for instance red, yellow, green, cyan, blue or magenta.
    In digital arts, HSV color uses hue together with saturation and value.
  4. (figuratively) A character; aspect, blee.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French hu, a hunting cry

Noun[edit]

hue (plural hues)

  1. (obsolete) A shout or cry.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin hodiē.

Adverb[edit]

hue

  1. today

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse húfa.

Noun[edit]

hue c (singular definite huen, plural indefinite huer)

  1. A cap
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse huga (think)

Verb[edit]

hue (imperative hu, infinitive at hue, present tense huer, past tense huede, past participle har huet)

  1. in?(transitive) To please

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

onomatopoeia, compare Dutch ju

Interjection[edit]

hue!

  1. yah!, cry to make (a) working animal(s) etc. advance or turn right
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

conjugated form

Verb[edit]

hue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of huer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of huer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of huer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of huer
  5. second-person singular imperative of huer

Anagrams[edit]


Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Common Polynesian

Noun[edit]

hue

  1. A gourd

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Common Polynesian

Noun[edit]

hue

  1. A gourd (plant)

Norwegian[edit]

Noun[edit]

hue

  1. A cap
  2. (dialect, metonymically) A head