git

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English get (offspring", especially "illegitimate offspring). A southern variant of Scots get (illegitimate child, brat), related to beget. (from Online Etymology Dictionary)

Noun[edit]

git (plural gits)

  1. (UK, slang, pejorative) A contemptible person.
  2. (UK, slang, pejorative) A silly, incompetent, stupid, annoying, or childish person.
    • 2007, Greg Weston, The Man Upstairs, ISBN 978-1-84799-957-3, page 124:
      You see, the story does that God didn't want Balaam to go where he was going. So God sent an angel to block the narrow pass. Now, our guy Balaam, riding his donkey, couldn't see the angel, but his donkey could [...]. Anyway, the donkey refuses to walk through the pass, so Balaam beats the donkey with a stick (nice guy!) Eventually God gives the donkey a voice and it says, "why 're you beating me you great stupid git? It's the angel with the sword that you gotta be careful of," or words to that effect.
Usage notes[edit]
  • 'Git' is usually used as an insult, more severe than twit but less severe than a true profanity like wanker or arsehole, and may often be used affectionately between friends. 'Get' can also be used, with a subtle change of meaning. 'You cheeky get!' is slightly less harsh than 'You cheeky git!'.
  • 'Git' is frequently used in conjunction with another word to achieve a more specific meaning. For instance a "smarmy git" refers to a person of a slimy, ingratiating disposition; a "jammy git" would be a person with undeserved luck. The phrase "grumpy old git", denoting a cantankerous old man, is used with particular frequency.
  • In parts of northern England, Northern Ireland and Scotland, 'get' is still used in preference to 'git'. In the Republic of Ireland, 'get', rather than 'git' is used.
  • The word has been ruled by the Speaker of the House of Commons to be unparliamentary language.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

git (third-person singular simple present gits, present participle gitting, simple past and past participle gitted)

  1. (Appalachia, Southern US, African American Vernacular) To get.
  2. (Appalachia, Southern US, African American Vernacular) To leave.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

git (plural gits)

  1. Alternative form of geat (channel in metal casting)

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French jet, or directly from Latin gagates after Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs), from Γάγας (Gágas, a town and river in Lycia).

Noun[edit]

git n, f (plural gitten, diminutive gitje n)

  1. (neuter) lignite
  2. (neuter) jet (black, gemstone-like geological material)
  3. (masculine) a stone made of this material

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

git

  1. Alternative spelling of gît. (third-person singular present indicative of gésir)

Usage notes[edit]

This spelling was a product of the 1990 French spelling reforms.


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

git n (invariable)

  1. A plant (Nigella sativa), variously named black cumin, Roman coriander, or melanthion.

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

git

  1. rafsi of jgita.

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ġit

  1. you two (nominative dual form of þū)

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jut, remodeled in Proto-Northwest Germanic to *jit by analogy with *wit.

Pronoun[edit]

git

  1. You two; nominative dual form of thū.

Declension[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Verb[edit]

git

  1. Imperative of gitmek.

Vilamovian[edit]

Noun[edit]

git f

  1. goodness