wit

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See also: WIT

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English witt (understanding, intellect, sense, knowledge, consciousness, conscience), from Proto-Germanic *witją (knowledge, reason), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd-, *wid- (see, know). Cognate with Dutch weet, German Witz, Danish vid, Swedish vett, Gothic 𐌿𐌽𐍅𐌹𐍄𐌹 (unwiti, ignorance), Latin videō (see). Compare wise.

Noun[edit]

wit (plural wits)

  1. (now usually in the plural) Sanity.
    He's gone completely out of his wits.
  2. (obsolete usually in the plural) The senses.
  3. Intellectual ability; faculty of thinking, reasoning.
    Where she has gone to is beyond the wit of man to say.
  4. The ability to think quickly; mental cleverness, especially under short time constraints.
    My father had a quick wit and a steady hand.
  5. Intelligence; common sense.
    The opportunity was right in front of you, and you didn't even have the wit to take it!
  6. Humour, especially when clever or quick.
    The best man's speech was hilarious, full of wit and charm.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; [] . Our table in the dining-room became again the abode of scintillating wit and caustic repartee, Farrar bracing up to his old standard, and the demand for seats in the vicinity rose to an animated competition.
  7. A person who tells funny anecdotes or jokes; someone witty.
    Your friend is quite a wit, isn't he?
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

(type of humor):

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English witan, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd-, *wid- (see, know). Cognate with Dutch weten, German wissen, Swedish veta, and Latin videō (I see). Compare guide.

Verb[edit]

wit (see below for this verb’s conjugation)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, chiefly archaic) Know, be aware of (construed with of when used intransitively).
    You committed terrible actions — to wit, murder and theft — and should be punished accordingly.
    They are meddling in matters that men should not wit of.
    • 1849, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, St. Luke the Painter, lines 5–8
      but soon having wist
      How sky-breadth and field-silence and this day
      Are symbols also in some deeper way,
      She looked through these to God and was God’s priest.
Conjugation[edit]
Infinitive to wit
Imperative wit
Present participle witting
Past participle wist
Present indicative Past indicative
First-person singular I wot I wist
Second-person singular thou wost, wot(test) (archaic); you wot thou wist(est) (archaic), you wist
Third-person singular he/she/it wot he/she/it wist
First-person plural we wit(e) we wist
Second-person plural ye wit(e) (archaic); you wit(e) ye wist (archaic), you wist
Third-person plural they wit(e) they wist
Usage notes[edit]
  • As a preterite-present verb, the third-person singular indicative form is not wits but wot; the plural indicative forms conform to the infinitive: we wit, ye wit, they wit.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From English with.

Pronunciation[edit]

(Southern American English): IPA: (before consonants) /wɪt/, (before vowels) /wɪtʃ/

Preposition[edit]

wit

  1. (Southern American English) Alternative spelling of with

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch wit.

Adjective[edit]

wit (attributive witte, comparative witter, superlative witste)

  1. white

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *wīt with unexpected shortening of the vowel, from Proto-Germanic *hwītaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱweytos (shine; bright). Compare German weiß, West Frisian wyt, English white, Norwegian hvit, Swedish vit.

Adjective[edit]

wit (comparative witter, superlative witst)

  1. white
    De wand is wit.
    The (inner) wall is white.
  2. legal
  3. pure, untainted
  4. (archaic) clear-lighted, not dark at all
    De lang gewenschte dagh verscheen, heel klaer en wit.
    The long-wished-for day appeared, very clear and white.
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

wit n (plural witten, diminutive witje n)

  1. (uncountable) white (color)
    Wit is alle kleuren ineens.
    White is all colors at once.
  2. (archaic) (short for doelwit (goal, target, the white in a bullseye)
    Myn wit is Adam en zyn afkomst te bederven. (in Lucifer, by Vondel)
    My goal is to corrupt Adam and his origin.
  3. (slang) cocaine
    Heb je een halfje wit?
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: wit

Verb[edit]

wit

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of witten
  2. imperative of witten

Anagrams[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch wit. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *witją (knowledge, reason), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd-, *wid- (see, know). Related to weten (to know), wis (knowledge) and wijs (wise). Cognate with English wit, German Witz.

Noun[edit]

wit n (plural witten, diminutive witje n)

  1. (archaic) ability to think and reason
  2. (archaic) knowledge
Related terms[edit]

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wit

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌹𐍄

Louisiana Creole French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French huit.

Numeral[edit]

wit

  1. (cardinal) eight

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Mauritian Creole cardinal numbers
7 8 9
    Cardinal : wit
    Ordinal : witiem

Etymology[edit]

From French huit.

Numeral[edit]

wit

  1. (cardinal) eight

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wet, from Proto-Indo-European *wed-, a suffixed form of *wei- (see ). Cognate with Old Norse vit, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐍄 (wit), and Lithuanian vèdu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

wit (personal)

  1. We two; nominative dual form of .

Old French[edit]

Numeral[edit]

wit

  1. eight

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīdaz, whence also Old Saxon wīt, Old English wīd and Old Norse víðr.

Adjective[edit]

wit

  1. wide

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wet.

Pronoun[edit]

wit

  1. We two; nominative dual form of ik.

Declension[edit]