stem

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See also: STEM

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English stemn, stefn (stem, trunk (of a tree)), from Proto-Germanic *stamniz.

Noun[edit]

stem (plural stems)

  1. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.
    • Milton
      all that are of noble stem
    • Herbert
      While I do pray, learn here thy stem / And true descent.
  2. A branch of a family.
    • Shakespeare
      This is a stem / Of that victorious stock.
  3. An advanced or leading position; the lookout.
    • Fuller
      Wolsey sat at the stem more than twenty years.
  4. (botany) The above-ground stalk (technically axis) of a vascular plant, and certain anatomically similar, below-ground organs such as rhizomes, bulbs, tubers, and corms.
    • Sir Walter Raleigh
      After they are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough nor twig in the trunk or the stem.
  5. A slender supporting member of an individual part of a plant such as a flower or a leaf; also, by analogy, the shaft of a feather.
    the stem of an apple or a cherry
    • 2013 May-June, William E. Conner, “An Acoustic Arms Race”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 206-7: 
      Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.
  6. A narrow part on certain man-made objects, such as a wine glass, a tobacco pipe, a spoon.
  7. (linguistics) The main part of an uninflected word to which affixes may be added to form inflections of the word. A stem often has a more fundamental root. Systematic conjugations and declensions derive from their stems.
  8. (typography) A vertical stroke of a letter.
  9. (music) A vertical stroke of a symbol representing a note in written music.
  10. (nautical) The vertical or nearly vertical forward extension of the keel, to which the forward ends of the planks or strakes are attached.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

stem (third-person singular simple present stems, present participle stemming, simple past and past participle stemmed)

  1. To remove the stem from.
    to stem cherries; to stem tobacco leaves
  2. To be caused or derived; to originate.
    The current crisis stems from the short-sighted politics of the previous government.
  3. To descend in a family line.
  4. To direct the stem (of a ship) against; to make headway against.
  5. (obsolete) To hit with the stem of a ship; to ram.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.ii:
      As when two warlike Brigandines at sea, / With murdrous weapons arm'd to cruell fight, / Doe meete together on the watry lea, / They stemme ech other with so fell despight, / That with the shocke of their owne heedlesse might, / Their wooden ribs are shaken nigh a sonder []
  6. To ram (clay, etc.) into a blasting hole.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse stemma (to stop, stem, dam) (whence Danish stemme/stæmme (to stem, dam up)), from Proto-Germanic *stammijaną. Cognate with German stemmen, Dutch stemmen, stempen; compare stammer.

Verb[edit]

stem (third-person singular simple present stems, present participle stemming, simple past and past participle stemmed)

  1. To stop, hinder (for instance, a river or blood).
    to stem a tide
    • Denham
      [They] stem the flood with their erected breasts.
    • Alexander Pope
      Stemmed the wild torrent of a barbarous age.
  2. (skiing) To move the feet apart and point the tips of the skis inward in order to slow down the speed or to facilitate a turn.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

stem (plural stems)

  1. Alternative form of steem

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch stem (noun) and stemmen (verb).

Noun[edit]

stem (plural stemme)

  1. vote

Verb[edit]

stem (present stem, present participle stemmende, past participle gestem)

  1. to vote

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *stemma, from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stemnō. Under influence of Latin vox (voice, word), it acquired the now obsolete sense of "word".

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stem f (plural stemmen, diminutive stemmetje n)

  1. voice
  2. vote
  3. (obsolete) word

Verb[edit]

stem

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stemmen
  2. imperative of stemmen

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

stem

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of stō

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

stem

  1. imperative of stemme

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English stamp.

Noun[edit]

stem

  1. stamp