haste

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Blend of Middle English hasten (verb), (compare Dutch haasten, German hasten, Danish haste, Swedish hasta (to hasten, rush)) and Middle English hast (haste, noun), from Old French haste (French: hâte)[1], from Old Frankish *haist, *haifst (violence) [2], from Proto-Germanic *haifstiz (struggle, conflict), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱēybʰ- (fast, snell, fierce). Akin to Old Frisian hāst, hāste (haste), Old English hǣst (violence), Old English hǣste (violent, impetuous, vehement, adj), Old Norse heift/heipt (feud), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐍆𐍃𐍄𐍃 (haifsts, rivalry). Cognate with German and Danish heftig (vehement).

Noun[edit]

haste (uncountable)

  1. Speed; swiftness; dispatch.
    We were running late so we finished our meal in haste.
    • Bible, 1 Sam. xxi. 8
      The king's business required haste.
  2. (obsolete) Hurry; urgency; sudden excitement of feeling or passion; precipitance; vehemence.
    • Bible, Psalms cxvi. 11
      I said in my haste, All men are liars.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

haste (third-person singular simple present hastes, present participle hasting, simple past and past participle hasted)

  1. (transitive) To urge onward; to hasten
  2. (intransitive) To move with haste.
    • 1594, “The Wounds of Civill War”, in A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition)[1]:
      The city is amaz'd, for Sylla hastes To enter Rome with fury, sword and fire.
    • 1825, Samuel Johnson, The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes[2]:
      He hastes away to another, whom his affairs have called to a distant place, and, having seen the empty house, goes away disgusted by a disappointment which could not be intended, because it could not be foreseen.
    • 1881, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present[3]:
      Samson hastes not; but neither does he pause to rest.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Etymology
  2. ^ Le Robert pour tous, Dictionnaire de la langue française, Janvier 2004, p. 524

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

haste

  1. hastily

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From hasta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

haste f (plural hastes)

  1. pole
  2. (botany) stem, stalk