witan

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English witan, plural of wita (wise man), or more literally "men of wit", "wits".

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

witan (plural witans)

  1. The Anglo-Saxon national council or witenagemot.
    1833, But in estimating the powers of the witan, we must not lose sight of the fact, that the king sometimes assumes a tone of superiority scarcely consistent with its independence. — SA Dunham, Europe in the Middle Ages (Green & Longman, p.48)
  2. The members of such an assembly.

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

witan

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *witaną, whence also Old English and Old Saxon witan, Old High German wizzan, Old Norse vita. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *woidh₂e, originally a perfect form of *weyd- (see).

Verb[edit]

witan

  1. to know

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inflected forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

witan

  1. nominative plural of wita

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *witaną, from Proto-Indo-European *woidh₂e, originally a perfect form of *weyd- (see). Cognate with Old Frisian wita, Old Saxon witan/wēt (Dutch weten), Old High German wizzan/weiz (German wissen), Old Norse vita/veit (Swedish veta), Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽 (witan)/𐍅𐌰𐌹𐍄 (wait). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin videō, Proto-Baltic *waid- (Lithuanian vadinti), Proto-Slavic *vēde- (Old Church Slavonic вѣдѣти (věděti), Russian ве́дать (védatʹ)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

witan

  1. to know, be aware
  2. to be wise
  3. to be conscious of, to know or feel (an emotion etc.)
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wītaną. Cognate with Old Norse víta, Dutch wijten.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wītan

  1. to blame, accuse, reproach
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *witaną, whence also Old English and Old Dutch witan, Old Frisian wita, Old High German wizzan, Old Norse vita, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽 (witan). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *woidh₂e, originally a perfect form of *weyd- (see).

Verb[edit]

witan (3 singular present wēt, 3 singular preterite wissa, preterite plural wissun, no past participle)

  1. to know
Conjugation[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wītaną.

Verb[edit]

wītan (3 singular present wītid, 3 singular preterite wēt, preterite plural witun, past participle giwitan)

  1. to reproach, to blame
Conjugation[edit]