wist

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See also: -wist

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Past indicative of wit: from Old English witan, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd-, *wid- (see, know). Cognate with Dutch weten, German wissen, Swedish veta, and Latin videō (I see). Compare guide.

Verb[edit]

wist

  1. (archaic) simple past tense and past participle of wit
    • a1796, Robert Burns, "Bonie Jean: A Ballad", in Poems and Songs, P.F. Collier & Son (1909–14), Bartleby.com (2001), [1],
      And lang ere witless Jeanie wist, / Her heart was tint, her peace was stown!

Etymology 2[edit]

A misunderstanding, or a joking use of the past indicative of wit: from Old English witan, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd-, *wid- (see, know). Cognate with Dutch weten, German wissen, Swedish veta, and Latin videō (I see). Compare guide.

Verb[edit]

wist (third-person singular simple present wists, present participle wisting, simple past and past participle wisted)

  1. (nonstandard, pseudo-archaic) To know, be aware of.
Usage notes[edit]
  • (Discuss(+) this sense) This use of wist was never a part of the regular English language; rather, it resulted from the erroneous attempted use of archaisms.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wist

  1. singular past indicative of weten
  2. second- and third-person singular present indicative of wissen
  3. plural imperative of wissen

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wistiz (essence), a derivative of Old English wesan (to exist, be). Cognate with Old Saxon wist, Old High German wist, Old Norse vist, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐍃𐍄𐍃 (wists).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wist f

  1. being, existence; well-being
  2. abundance, plenty; provisions, food
  3. feast; meal; delicacy

Declension[edit]