for

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English for, from Old English for (for, on account of, for the sake of, through, because of, owing to, from, by reason of, as to, in order to), from Proto-Germanic *furi (for), from Proto-Indo-European *peri- (around). Cognate with West Frisian for, foar (for), Dutch voor (for), German für (for), Danish for (for), Swedish för (for), Norwegian for (for), Icelandic fyrir (for), Latin per (by, through, for, by means of), Ancient Greek περί (peri, for, about, toward), Lithuanian per (by, through, during), Sanskrit परि (pári, over, around).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

for

  1. Because.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Chapter 23
      "By means of the Golden Cap I shall command the Winged Monkeys to carry you to the gates of the Emerald City," said Glinda, "for it would be a shame to deprive the people of so wonderful a ruler."
    He lost his job, for he got into trouble.

Translations[edit]

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. Towards.
    The astronauts headed for the moon.
  2. Directed at, intended to belong to.
    I have something for you.
  3. Supporting (opposite of against).
    All those for the motion raise your hands.
  4. Because of.
    He wouldn't apologize; and just for that, she refused to help him.
    (UK usage) He looks better for having lost weight.
    She was the worse for drink.
    • Shakespeare
      with fiery eyes sparkling for very wrath
  5. Over a period of time.
    They fought for days over a silly pencil.
    • Garth
      To guide the sun's bright chariot for a day.
  6. Throughout an extent of space.
    • Shakespeare
      For many miles about / There's scarce a bush.
  7. On behalf of.
    I will stand in for him.
  8. Instead of, or in place of.
    • Bible, Exodus xxi. 23, 24
      And if any mischief follow, then thou shalt give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.
  9. In order to obtain or acquire.
    I am aiming for completion by the end of business Thursday.
    He's going for his doctorate.
    Do you want to go for coffee?
    People all over Greece looked to Delphi for answers.
    Can you go to the store for some eggs?
    I'm saving up for a car.
    Don't wait for an answer.
    What did he ask you for?
    • Denham
      He writes not for money, nor for praise.
  10. In the direction of: marks a point one is going toward.
    Run for the hills!
    He was headed for the door when he remembered.
    • Francis Bacon
      We sailed from Peru for China and Japan.
  11. By the standards of, usually with the implication of those standards being lower than one might otherwise expect.
    Fair for its day.
    She's spry for an old lady.
  12. Despite, in spite of.
    • 1892 August 6, Charles Dickens, "The Unbidden Guest", in All the Year Round,[1] page 133,
      Mr. Joseph Blenkinshaw was perhaps not worth quite so much as was reported; but for all that he was a very wealthy man []
    • 1968, J. J. Scarisbrick, Henry VIII (page 240)
      For all his faults, there had been something lofty and great about him - as a judge, as a patron of education, as a builder, as an international figure.
  13. Used to indicate the subject of a to-infinitive.
    For that to happen now is incredibly unlikely. (=It is incredibly unlikely that that will happen now.)
    All I want is for you to be happy. (=All I want is that you be happy.)
  14. (chiefly US) Out of; used to indicate a fraction, a ratio
    In term of base hits, Jones was three for four on the day
  15. (cricket) used as part of a score to indicate the number of wickets that have fallen
    At close of play, England were 305 for 3.
  16. Indicating that in the character of or as being which anything is regarded or treated; to be, or as being.
    • Cowley
      We take a falling meteor for a star.
    • John Locke
      If a man can be fully assured of anything for a truth, without having examined, what is there that he may not embrace for true?
    • Dryden
      Most of our ingenious young men take up some cry'd-up English poet for their model.
    • Philips
      But let her go for an ungrateful woman.
  17. Used to construe various verbs. See the entry for the phrasal verb.
  18. (obsolete) Indicating that in prevention of which, or through fear of which, anything is done.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      We'll have a bib, for spoiling of thy doublet.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Statistics[edit]

References[edit]

  • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse fóðr, from Middle Low German vōder (linen, sheath), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (sheath).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

for n (singular definite foret, plural indefinite for)

  1. lining (covering for the inside of something)
  2. lining (material used for inside covering)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

for

  1. too (more than enough; as too much)
  2. in front
  3. forward

Conjunction[edit]

for

  1. for, because

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. for
  2. of
  3. to
  4. on
  5. at
  6. before, in front of
  7. by

Etymology 3[edit]

See fare (to rush, run).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /foːr/, [foːˀɐ̯]

Verb[edit]

for, fór or farede

  1. past tense of fare.

Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

for

  1. away, far, gone
    • 1998, Henrik Ibsen, trans. Odd Tangerud Puphejmo : Dramo en tri aktoj, [2]
      NORA (komencas elpreni el la skatolo, sed baldaŭ forĵetas ĉion). Ho, se mi kuraĝus eliri. Se nur neniu venus. Se nur ne dume okazus io hejme. Stulta babilaĵo; neniu venos. Nur ne pensi. Brosi la mufon. Delikataj gantoj, delikataj gantoj. For el la pensoj! For, for! Unu, du, tri, kvar, kvin, ses — (krias) Jen, tie ili venas —
      NORA (begins to unpack the box, but soon pushes it all away). Oh, if I dared go out. If only no one would come. If only I could be sure nothing would happen here in the meantime. Stupid nonsense; no one will come. Only I mustn't think about it. I will brush my muff. What lovely, lovely gloves. Out of my thoughts, Away, away! One, two, three, four, five, six— (Screams) There, someone's coming—

Derived terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inflected form of ir (to go).

Verb[edit]

for

  1. first-person singular future subjunctive of ir
  2. third-person singular future subjunctive of ir

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of ser (to be).

Verb[edit]

for

  1. first-person singular future subjunctive of ser
  2. third-person singular future subjunctive of ser

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

for f (for-ar, for-ir)

  1. mud
  2. a bog

Derived terms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. far from

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to speak). Cognates include fama (news; fame), fabula (story, tale, fable), Ancient Greek φημί (phēmi, speak), φάτις (phatis, rumour, news, speech), φάσις (phasis, speech, announcement), φωνή (phōnē, voice), Old Church Slavonic баяти (bajati, tell, narrate) and баснь (basnĭ, fable) (Russian баять (bajatʹ) and басня (basnja)) and Old English bannan (English ban). Compare also Sanskrit भनति (bhánati, speak).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active for, present infinitive fārī, perfect active fātus sum (deponent)

  1. I speak, talk, say.

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

for

  1. for

Synonyms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. for

Verb[edit]

for

  1. past tense of fare.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

for

  1. for

Synonyms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. for

Novial[edit]

Adjective[edit]

for

  1. away

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fura

Preposition[edit]

for

  1. for

Etymology 2[edit]

see faran

Verb[edit]

fōr

  1. first-person singular preterite of faran
  2. third-person singular preterite of faran

Noun[edit]

fōr f

  1. journey, going, course, expedition, approach; passage, lifestyle, way of life
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Old English

Noun[edit]

fōr m

  1. hog, pig
Declension[edit]

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *swesero-, from Proto-Celtic *swīs (you (pl.)); compare Latin vester.

Determiner[edit]

for

  1. your (plural)
  2. you (plural; as the object of a preposition that takes the genitive)
    • circa 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, Wb. 16d8
      Bíuu-sa oc irbáig dar far cenn-si fri Maccidóndu.
      I am boasting about you to the Macedonians.

Synonyms[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

for

  1. Alternative form of fora.

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

for

  1. first-person singular future subjunctive of ir
  2. third-person singular future subjunctive of ir

Verb[edit]

for

  1. first-person singular future subjunctive of ser
  2. third-person singular future subjunctive of ser

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

for

  1. past tense of fara.