mor

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Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *moriō < Latin morior. Compare Daco-Romanian muri, mor.

Verb[edit]

mor (past participle muritã)

  1. I die.

Related terms[edit]


Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *mori (compare Welsh môr, Old Irish muir), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (compare Latin mare, English mere, German Meer, Dutch meer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mor m

  1. sea

Derived terms[edit]

  • Mor-Bihan (Department in Brittany, meaning "small sea")

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

mor

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of morir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of morir

Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *mori (compare Welsh môr, Old Irish muir), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (compare Latin mare, English mere, German Meer, Dutch meer).

Noun[edit]

mor m (plural moryow)

  1. sea

Derived terms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *mer-.

Noun[edit]

mor m

  1. plague (specific disease)
  2. pestilence, plague (any highly contagious disease)

Derived terms[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mūrus.

Noun[edit]

mor m

  1. wall

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From moder, from Old Norse móðir, from Proto-Germanic *mōdēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mor c (singular definite moren, plural indefinite mødre)

  1. mother (woman who has, conceives, gives birth to, or raises a child)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably a merging of two words

Noun[edit]

mor c (singular definite moren or morren, not used in plural form)

  1. (geology) raw humus

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin Maurus, from Ancient Greek μαυρός (maurós, dark).

Noun[edit]

mor c (singular definite moren, plural indefinite morer)

  1. (dated) Moor
Synonyms[edit]
Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

mor

  1. Imperative of more.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mor

  1. first-person singular present indicative of morren
  2. imperative of morren

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

mor

  1. rafsi of morko.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From moder, from Old Norse móðir, from Proto-Germanic *mōdēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr.

Noun[edit]

mor m, f (definite singular mora or moren, indefinite plural mødre or mødrer, definite plural mødrene)

  1. a mother

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (archaic, formal or jokingly) moder

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse móðir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mor f (definite singular mora; indefinite plural mødrer; definite plural mødrene)

  1. mother

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *mōraz. Cognate with Old Saxon mōr (Dutch moer), Middle Low German mōr (German Moor), Old High German muor, Old Norse mǫr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mōr m

  1. moor
  2. mountain

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mor

  1. first-person singular present tense form of muri.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of muri.
  3. third-person plural present tense form of muri.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Short form of moder.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mor c

  1. mother

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mor

  1. purple

Adjective[edit]

mor

  1. purple

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA: [mɔr]

Adverb[edit]

mor

  1. how, so, as