ak

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Antillean Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Its usage as meaning "with" and "and" is modelled after usage of similar terms in substrate languages.[1] Its phonological form might be from French avec (with) or Wolof ak or both.

Conjunction[edit]

ak

  1. and (for connecting two noun phrases)

Preposition[edit]

ak

  1. with

Gagauz[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic ak (“white”), from Proto-Turkic *āk, *Āk (white).

Adjective[edit]

ak (comparative daha ak, superlative en ak)

  1. white

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ak

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌺

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Its usage as meaning "with" and "and" is modelled after usage of similar terms in substrate languages.[2] Its phonological form might be from French avec (with) or Wolof ak or both.

Conjunction[edit]

ak

  1. and (for connecting two noun phrases)

Preposition[edit]

ak

  1. with

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A borrowing from German ach (oh). In 16th- and 17h-century literature, o or oh was often used in this sense. In a text from 1638, German ach is translated as ok, which points to a borrowing from Russian ох (ox). The from ak, from German, was introduced in the 17th-18th century.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)

Interjection[edit]

ak

  1. used to indicate various feelings: joy, excitement, fear, distress; oh! ah!
    ak, cik lieliski!oh! how great!
    ak, kāda laime!oh, such happiness!
    ak, kas par prieku!oh, what joy!
    ak, kā patīk!oh, how pleasant!
    ak, briesmas!oh! danger!
    ak, brīvība! tā ir vitamīns, kas dzelzij un akmenim cauri ēdasah! freedom! that is a vitamin that eats through stone and iron
    vai tu viņus atradi? ak, mani bērni, mani bērniņi! — have you found them? oh, my children, my (poor) little children!
    “matemātika”, zēns bubina un izņem grāmatu... ak vai, ak vai, un visi citi jau guļ! — “mathematics,” the boy whispered and took the book... oh, oh (= poor me!), and all others are already sleeping (but I must study)!
  2. used to express certain mental statese.g., surprise, disappointment, disapproval — in an emotional but also intelligent, perceptive way; ah! oh!
    ak, ko es redzu!ah! what do I see (here)!
    ak, kas par godu!ah! what an honor!
    ak, kā jāstrādā!oh! what should be done?
    ak, kaut es dabūtu!ah! if only I could get (that)!
    ak, tas tikai sīkums!oh, that's just a trifle
    ak, vasara, vasara, kā tu vari mulsināt jaunu meiču sirdis!ah! summer, summer, how you can confuse young girls' hearts!
  3. (often in combination with the pronoun tu (you)) used to reinforce an interjection by either literally or metaphorically attributing some characteristic to the hearer; (ah,) you ... ! you ... ! oh ...!
    ak (tu) neprāts!ah, you crazy one!
    ak tu palaidnis tāds! — (ah,) you rascal!
    ak (tu) kungs!oh Lord!
    ak (tu) dievs!oh God!
    ak (tu) velns!oh devil!
    ak (tu) ļauna pasaule!oh evil world!
    nē, nē, māt, pavasarī gan grūti mirt; visas puķītes zied, putniņi dzied, ak tu jaukā pasaulīte! — no, no, mother, it is difficult to die in spring; all the little flowers are blooming, the birds are singing, oh (you) lovely world!
    ak tu mūžs, kas te to zvēru!” māte iesaucās, redzot pēdas sniegā — “ah life, what wild beast is that!” the mother exclaimed, seeing tracks in the snow

Particle[edit]

ak

  1. used to give an interjectional flavor to an utterance, especially when expressing surprise; oh!
    ak tu tas esi!oh! that's you!
    ak tad tā!oh, it's like that, then!
    ak paspēji gan!oh, you did it!
    ak tāds tu esi!oh, that's what you're like!
    ak jā! ak nē! ak tā!oh, yes! oh, no! oh!... (expressions used when suddenly remembering something)
    ak jā, gandrīz būtu piemirsis: labasdienas, māt, no Līzesoh yes, I had almost forgotten: greetings, mother, from Līze
    ak tad tur tā vaina!” Ozols beidzot saprata — “ooh, there then is the blame (= problem)!” Ozols finally understood

References[edit]

  1. ^ “ak” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ak. Cognate with Old English ac, Gothic 𐌰𐌺 (ak), Old High German oh.

Conjunction[edit]

ak

  1. but

Pumpokol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔaq-ɔt- ("to sleep").

Verb[edit]

ak

  1. to lie down

Related terms[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ak

  1. if

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Abbreviation [please replace this header][edit]

ak

  1. short for akademisk kvart

Tocharian A[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tocharian *ëk, from Late Proto-Indo-European *okʷs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃okʷ-, *h₃ekʷ- (eye; to see). Compare Tocharian B ek.

Noun[edit]

ak

  1. eye

Related terms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic ak (“white”), from Proto-Turkic *āk, *Āk (white).

Adjective[edit]

ak (comparative daha ak, superlative en ak)

  1. white
  2. (figuratively) clean
  3. (figuratively) honest
  4. (figuratively) comfortable

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

ak (definite accusative akı, plural aklar)

  1. white

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

ak

  1. Second-person imperative of akmak.

Antonyms[edit]


Turkmen[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic ak (“white”), from Proto-Turkic *āk, *Āk (white).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ak

  1. white