mental

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle French mental, from Late Latin mentālis (of the mind, mental), from Latin mēns (the mind). Also from Latin mentum (the chin), depending on usage.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mental (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to the mind or an intellectual process.
    • 1907, Robert Chambers, chapter 6, The Younger Set[1]:
      “I don't mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, [] the speed-mad fugitives from the furies of ennui, the neurotic victims of mental cirrhosis, … !”
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34: 
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
  2. (colloquial, comparable) Insane, mad, crazy.
    he is the most mental freshman I've seen yet;  he went mental on us
  3. (colloquial, UK, comparable) Enjoyable; fun.
    That was a mental party last night.
  4. (anatomy) Of or relating to the chin or median part of the lower jaw, genial.
    the mental nerve;  the mental region
  5. (biology) Of or relating to the chin-like or lip-like structure.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Noun[edit]

mental (plural mentals)

  1. (zoology) A plate or scale covering the mentum or chin of a fish or reptile.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mentālis.

Adjective[edit]

mental (epicene, plural mentales)

  1. mental

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mentālis.

Adjective[edit]

mental m, f (masculine and feminine plural mentals)

  1. mental

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mentālis (of the mind, mental), from Latin mēns (the mind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mental m (feminine mentale, masculine plural mentaux, feminine plural mentales)

  1. mental (relating to the mind)

Noun[edit]

mental m (uncountable)

  1. mind
    Elle a un mental d'acier.

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mentālis.

Adjective[edit]

mental m, f (plural mentais)

  1. mental

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mentālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mental (not comparable)

  1. mental

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mentālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mental m, f (plural mentais; comparable)

  1. mental

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mentālis.

Adjective[edit]

mental m, f (plural mentales)

  1. mental

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mental

  1. mental, pertaining to the mind

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]